framebuffer device demuxer
[ffmpeg.git] / doc / indevs.texi
index cf29c4c..1cd2dd6 100644 (file)
@@ -5,8 +5,8 @@ Input devices are configured elements in FFmpeg which allow to access
 the data coming from a multimedia device attached to your system.
 
 When you configure your FFmpeg build, all the supported input devices
-are enabled by default. You can list them using the configure option
-"--list-indevs".
+are enabled by default. You can list all available ones using the
+configure option "--list-indevs".
 
 You can disable all the input devices using the configure option
 "--disable-indevs", and selectively enable an input device using the
@@ -25,7 +25,7 @@ ALSA (Advanced Linux Sound Architecture) input device.
 To enable this input device during configuration you need libasound
 installed on your system.
 
-This device allows to capture from an ALSA device. The name of the
+This device allows capturing from an ALSA device. The name of the
 device to capture has to be an ALSA card identifier.
 
 An ALSA identifier has the syntax:
@@ -42,7 +42,7 @@ specify card number or identifier, device number and subdevice number
 To see the list of cards currently recognized by your system check the
 files @file{/proc/asound/cards} and @file{/proc/asound/devices}.
 
-For example to capture with @file{ffmpeg} from an alsa device with
+For example to capture with @file{ffmpeg} from an ALSA device with
 card id 0, you may run the command:
 @example
 ffmpeg -f alsa -i hw:0 alsaout.wav
@@ -51,10 +51,6 @@ ffmpeg -f alsa -i hw:0 alsaout.wav
 For more information see:
 @url{http://www.alsa-project.org/alsa-doc/alsa-lib/pcm.html}
 
-@section audio_beos
-
-BeOS audio input device.
-
 @section bktr
 
 BSD video input device.
@@ -63,40 +59,65 @@ BSD video input device.
 
 Linux DV 1394 input device.
 
+@section fbdev
+
+Linux framebuffer input device.
+
+The Linux framebuffer is a graphic hardware-independent abstraction
+layer to show graphics on a computer monitor, typically on the
+console. It is accessed through a file device node, usually
+@file{/dev/fb0}.
+
+For more detailed information read the file
+Documentation/fb/framebuffer.txt included in the Linux source tree.
+
+For example, to record from the framebuffer device @file{/dev/fb0} with
+@file{ffmpeg}:
+@example
+ffmpeg -f fbdev -r 10 -i /dev/fb0 out.avi
+@end example
+
+You can take a single screenshot image with the command:
+@example
+ffmpeg -f fbdev -vframes 1 -r 1 -i /dev/fb0 screenshot.jpeg
+@end example
+
+See also @url{http://linux-fbdev.sourceforge.net/}, and fbset(1).
+
 @section jack
 
-Jack input device.
+JACK input device.
 
 To enable this input device during configuration you need libjack
 installed on your system.
 
-A jack input device creates one or more jack writable clients, one for
+A JACK input device creates one or more JACK writable clients, one for
 each audio channel, with name @var{client_name}:input_@var{N}, where
 @var{client_name} is the name provided by the application, and @var{N}
 is a number which identifies the channel.
 Each writable client will send the acquired data to the FFmpeg input
 device.
 
-Once you have created one or more jack readable clients, you need to
-connect them to one or more jack writable clients.
+Once you have created one or more JACK readable clients, you need to
+connect them to one or more JACK writable clients.
 
-To connect or disconnect jack clients you can use the
+To connect or disconnect JACK clients you can use the
 @file{jack_connect} and @file{jack_disconnect} programs, or do it
 through a graphical interface, for example with @file{qjackctl}.
 
-To list the jack clients and their properties you can invoke the command
+To list the JACK clients and their properties you can invoke the command
 @file{jack_lsp}.
 
-Follows an example which shows how to capture a jack readable client
+Follows an example which shows how to capture a JACK readable client
 with @file{ffmpeg}.
 @example
-# create a jack writable client with name "ffmpeg"
+# Create a JACK writable client with name "ffmpeg".
 $ ffmpeg -f jack -i ffmpeg -y out.wav
 
-# start the sample jack_metro readable client
+# Start the sample jack_metro readable client.
 $ jack_metro -b 120 -d 0.2 -f 4000
 
-# list the current jack clients
+# List the current JACK clients.
 $ jack_lsp -c
 system:capture_1
 system:capture_2
@@ -105,7 +126,7 @@ system:playback_2
 ffmpeg:input_1
 metro:120_bpm
 
-# connect metro to the ffmpeg writable client
+# Connect metro to the ffmpeg writable client.
 $ jack_connect metro:120_bpm ffmpeg:input_1
 @end example
 
@@ -122,9 +143,9 @@ Open Sound System input device.
 
 The filename to provide to the input device is the device node
 representing the OSS input device, and is usually set to
-@file{/dev/dsp/}.
+@file{/dev/dsp}.
 
-For example to grab from @file{/dev/dsp/} using @file{ffmpeg} use the
+For example to grab from @file{/dev/dsp} using @file{ffmpeg} use the
 command:
 @example
 ffmpeg -f oss -i /dev/dsp /tmp/oss.wav
@@ -139,17 +160,19 @@ Video4Linux and Video4Linux2 input video devices.
 
 The name of the device to grab is a file device node, usually Linux
 systems tend to automatically create such nodes when the device
-(e.g. an USB webcam) is plugged to the system, and has a name of the
+(e.g. an USB webcam) is plugged into the system, and has a name of the
 kind @file{/dev/video@var{N}}, where @var{N} is a number associated to
 the device.
 
 Video4Linux and Video4Linux2 devices only support a limited set of
 @var{width}x@var{height} sizes and framerates. You can check which are
-supported for example using the command @file{dov4l} for Video4Linux
-devices, and the command @file{v4l-info} for Video4Linux2 devices.
+supported for example with the command @file{dov4l} for Video4Linux
+devices and the command @file{v4l-info} for Video4Linux2 devices.
 
 If the size for the device is set to 0x0, the input device will
 try to autodetect the size to use.
+Only for the video4linux2 device, if the frame rate is set to 0/0 the
+input device will use the frame rate value already set in the driver.
 
 Video4Linux support is deprecated since Linux 2.6.30, and will be
 dropped in later versions.
@@ -157,19 +180,26 @@ dropped in later versions.
 Follow some usage examples of the video4linux devices with the ff*
 tools.
 @example
-# grab and show the input of a video4linux device
+# Grab and show the input of a video4linux device, frame rate is set
+# to the default of 25/1.
 ffplay -s 320x240 -f video4linux /dev/video0
 
-# grab and show the input of a video4linux2 device, autoadjust size
+# Grab and show the input of a video4linux2 device, autoadjust size.
 ffplay -f video4linux2 /dev/video0
 
-# grab and record the input of a video4linux2 device, autoadjust size
+# Grab and record the input of a video4linux2 device, autoadjust size,
+# frame rate value defaults to 0/0 so it is read from the video4linux2
+# driver.
 ffmpeg -f video4linux2 -i /dev/video0 out.mpeg
 @end example
 
 @section vfwcap
 
-VFW (Video For Window) catpure input device.
+VfW (Video for Windows) capture input device.
+
+The filename passed as input is the capture driver number, ranging from
+0 to 9. You may use "list" as filename to print a list of drivers. Any
+other filename will be interpreted as device number 0.
 
 @section x11grab
 
@@ -177,31 +207,30 @@ X11 video input device.
 
 This device allows to capture a region of an X11 display.
 
-The filename passed in input has the syntax:
+The filename passed as input has the syntax:
 @example
 [@var{hostname}]:@var{display_number}.@var{screen_number}[+@var{x_offset},@var{y_offset}]
 @end example
 
 @var{hostname}:@var{display_number}.@var{screen_number} specifies the
-X11 display name of the screen to grab from. @var{hostname} can be not
-specified, and defaults to "localhost". The environment variable
+X11 display name of the screen to grab from. @var{hostname} can be
+ommitted, and defaults to "localhost". The environment variable
 @env{DISPLAY} contains the default display name.
 
 @var{x_offset} and @var{y_offset} specify the offsets of the grabbed
-area with respect to the top/left border of the X11 screen image. They
+area with respect to the top-left border of the X11 screen. They
 default to 0.
 
 Check the X11 documentation (e.g. man X) for more detailed information.
 
 Use the @file{dpyinfo} program for getting basic information about the
-properties of your X11 display screen (e.g. grep for "name" or
-"dimensions").
+properties of your X11 display (e.g. grep for "name" or "dimensions").
 
 For example to grab from @file{:0.0} using @file{ffmpeg}:
 @example
 ffmpeg -f x11grab -r 25 -s cif -i :0.0 out.mpg
 
-# grab at position 10,20
+# Grab at position 10,20.
 ffmpeg -f x11grab -25 -s cif -i :0.0+10,20 out.mpg
 @end example