avformat/hlsenc:addition of #EXT-X-MEDIA tag and AUDIO attribute
[ffmpeg.git] / doc / muxers.texi
1 @chapter Muxers
2 @c man begin MUXERS
3
4 Muxers are configured elements in FFmpeg which allow writing
5 multimedia streams to a particular type of file.
6
7 When you configure your FFmpeg build, all the supported muxers
8 are enabled by default. You can list all available muxers using the
9 configure option @code{--list-muxers}.
10
11 You can disable all the muxers with the configure option
12 @code{--disable-muxers} and selectively enable / disable single muxers
13 with the options @code{--enable-muxer=@var{MUXER}} /
14 @code{--disable-muxer=@var{MUXER}}.
15
16 The option @code{-muxers} of the ff* tools will display the list of
17 enabled muxers. Use @code{-formats} to view a combined list of
18 enabled demuxers and muxers.
19
20 A description of some of the currently available muxers follows.
21
22 @anchor{aiff}
23 @section aiff
24
25 Audio Interchange File Format muxer.
26
27 @subsection Options
28
29 It accepts the following options:
30
31 @table @option
32 @item write_id3v2
33 Enable ID3v2 tags writing when set to 1. Default is 0 (disabled).
34
35 @item id3v2_version
36 Select ID3v2 version to write. Currently only version 3 and 4 (aka.
37 ID3v2.3 and ID3v2.4) are supported. The default is version 4.
38
39 @end table
40
41 @anchor{asf}
42 @section asf
43
44 Advanced Systems Format muxer.
45
46 Note that Windows Media Audio (wma) and Windows Media Video (wmv) use this
47 muxer too.
48
49 @subsection Options
50
51 It accepts the following options:
52
53 @table @option
54 @item packet_size
55 Set the muxer packet size. By tuning this setting you may reduce data
56 fragmentation or muxer overhead depending on your source. Default value is
57 3200, minimum is 100, maximum is 64k.
58
59 @end table
60
61 @anchor{avi}
62 @section avi
63
64 Audio Video Interleaved muxer.
65
66 @subsection Options
67
68 It accepts the following options:
69
70 @table @option
71 @item reserve_index_space
72 Reserve the specified amount of bytes for the OpenDML master index of each
73 stream within the file header. By default additional master indexes are
74 embedded within the data packets if there is no space left in the first master
75 index and are linked together as a chain of indexes. This index structure can
76 cause problems for some use cases, e.g. third-party software strictly relying
77 on the OpenDML index specification or when file seeking is slow. Reserving
78 enough index space in the file header avoids these problems.
79
80 The required index space depends on the output file size and should be about 16
81 bytes per gigabyte. When this option is omitted or set to zero the necessary
82 index space is guessed.
83
84 @item write_channel_mask
85 Write the channel layout mask into the audio stream header.
86
87 This option is enabled by default. Disabling the channel mask can be useful in
88 specific scenarios, e.g. when merging multiple audio streams into one for
89 compatibility with software that only supports a single audio stream in AVI
90 (see @ref{amerge,,the "amerge" section in the ffmpeg-filters manual,ffmpeg-filters}).
91
92 @end table
93
94 @anchor{chromaprint}
95 @section chromaprint
96
97 Chromaprint fingerprinter
98
99 This muxer feeds audio data to the Chromaprint library, which generates
100 a fingerprint for the provided audio data. It takes a single signed
101 native-endian 16-bit raw audio stream.
102
103 @subsection Options
104
105 @table @option
106 @item silence_threshold
107 Threshold for detecting silence, ranges from 0 to 32767. -1 for default
108 (required for use with the AcoustID service).
109
110 @item algorithm
111 Algorithm index to fingerprint with.
112
113 @item fp_format
114 Format to output the fingerprint as. Accepts the following options:
115 @table @samp
116 @item raw
117 Binary raw fingerprint
118
119 @item compressed
120 Binary compressed fingerprint
121
122 @item base64
123 Base64 compressed fingerprint
124
125 @end table
126
127 @end table
128
129 @anchor{crc}
130 @section crc
131
132 CRC (Cyclic Redundancy Check) testing format.
133
134 This muxer computes and prints the Adler-32 CRC of all the input audio
135 and video frames. By default audio frames are converted to signed
136 16-bit raw audio and video frames to raw video before computing the
137 CRC.
138
139 The output of the muxer consists of a single line of the form:
140 CRC=0x@var{CRC}, where @var{CRC} is a hexadecimal number 0-padded to
141 8 digits containing the CRC for all the decoded input frames.
142
143 See also the @ref{framecrc} muxer.
144
145 @subsection Examples
146
147 For example to compute the CRC of the input, and store it in the file
148 @file{out.crc}:
149 @example
150 ffmpeg -i INPUT -f crc out.crc
151 @end example
152
153 You can print the CRC to stdout with the command:
154 @example
155 ffmpeg -i INPUT -f crc -
156 @end example
157
158 You can select the output format of each frame with @command{ffmpeg} by
159 specifying the audio and video codec and format. For example to
160 compute the CRC of the input audio converted to PCM unsigned 8-bit
161 and the input video converted to MPEG-2 video, use the command:
162 @example
163 ffmpeg -i INPUT -c:a pcm_u8 -c:v mpeg2video -f crc -
164 @end example
165
166 @section flv
167
168 Adobe Flash Video Format muxer.
169
170 This muxer accepts the following options:
171
172 @table @option
173
174 @item flvflags @var{flags}
175 Possible values:
176
177 @table @samp
178
179 @item aac_seq_header_detect
180 Place AAC sequence header based on audio stream data.
181
182 @item no_sequence_end
183 Disable sequence end tag.
184
185 @item no_metadata
186 Disable metadata tag.
187
188 @item no_duration_filesize
189 Disable duration and filesize in metadata when they are equal to zero
190 at the end of stream. (Be used to non-seekable living stream).
191
192 @item add_keyframe_index
193 Used to facilitate seeking; particularly for HTTP pseudo streaming.
194 @end table
195 @end table
196
197 @anchor{dash}
198 @section dash
199
200 Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP (DASH) muxer that creates segments
201 and manifest files according to the MPEG-DASH standard ISO/IEC 23009-1:2014.
202
203 For more information see:
204
205 @itemize @bullet
206 @item
207 ISO DASH Specification: @url{http://standards.iso.org/ittf/PubliclyAvailableStandards/c065274_ISO_IEC_23009-1_2014.zip}
208 @item
209 WebM DASH Specification: @url{https://sites.google.com/a/webmproject.org/wiki/adaptive-streaming/webm-dash-specification}
210 @end itemize
211
212 It creates a MPD manifest file and segment files for each stream.
213
214 The segment filename might contain pre-defined identifiers used with SegmentTemplate
215 as defined in section 5.3.9.4.4 of the standard. Available identifiers are "$RepresentationID$",
216 "$Number$", "$Bandwidth$" and "$Time$".
217
218 @example
219 ffmpeg -re -i <input> -map 0 -map 0 -c:a libfdk_aac -c:v libx264
220 -b:v:0 800k -b:v:1 300k -s:v:1 320x170 -profile:v:1 baseline
221 -profile:v:0 main -bf 1 -keyint_min 120 -g 120 -sc_threshold 0
222 -b_strategy 0 -ar:a:1 22050 -use_timeline 1 -use_template 1
223 -window_size 5 -adaptation_sets "id=0,streams=v id=1,streams=a"
224 -f dash /path/to/out.mpd
225 @end example
226
227 @table @option
228 @item -min_seg_duration @var{microseconds}
229 Set the segment length in microseconds.
230 @item -window_size @var{size}
231 Set the maximum number of segments kept in the manifest.
232 @item -extra_window_size @var{size}
233 Set the maximum number of segments kept outside of the manifest before removing from disk.
234 @item -remove_at_exit @var{remove}
235 Enable (1) or disable (0) removal of all segments when finished.
236 @item -use_template @var{template}
237 Enable (1) or disable (0) use of SegmentTemplate instead of SegmentList.
238 @item -use_timeline @var{timeline}
239 Enable (1) or disable (0) use of SegmentTimeline in SegmentTemplate.
240 @item -single_file @var{single_file}
241 Enable (1) or disable (0) storing all segments in one file, accessed using byte ranges.
242 @item -single_file_name @var{file_name}
243 DASH-templated name to be used for baseURL. Implies @var{single_file} set to "1".
244 @item -init_seg_name @var{init_name}
245 DASH-templated name to used for the initialization segment. Default is "init-stream$RepresentationID$.m4s"
246 @item -media_seg_name @var{segment_name}
247 DASH-templated name to used for the media segments. Default is "chunk-stream$RepresentationID$-$Number%05d$.m4s"
248 @item -utc_timing_url @var{utc_url}
249 URL of the page that will return the UTC timestamp in ISO format. Example: "https://time.akamai.com/?iso"
250 @item -http_user_agent @var{user_agent}
251 Override User-Agent field in HTTP header. Applicable only for HTTP output.
252 @item -hls_playlist @var{hls_playlist}
253 Generate HLS playlist files as well. The master playlist is generated with the filename master.m3u8.
254 One media playlist file is generated for each stream with filenames media_0.m3u8, media_1.m3u8, etc.
255 @item -adaptation_sets @var{adaptation_sets}
256 Assign streams to AdaptationSets. Syntax is "id=x,streams=a,b,c id=y,streams=d,e" with x and y being the IDs
257 of the adaptation sets and a,b,c,d and e are the indices of the mapped streams.
258
259 To map all video (or audio) streams to an AdaptationSet, "v" (or "a") can be used as stream identifier instead of IDs.
260
261 When no assignment is defined, this defaults to an AdaptationSet for each stream.
262 @end table
263
264 @anchor{framecrc}
265 @section framecrc
266
267 Per-packet CRC (Cyclic Redundancy Check) testing format.
268
269 This muxer computes and prints the Adler-32 CRC for each audio
270 and video packet. By default audio frames are converted to signed
271 16-bit raw audio and video frames to raw video before computing the
272 CRC.
273
274 The output of the muxer consists of a line for each audio and video
275 packet of the form:
276 @example
277 @var{stream_index}, @var{packet_dts}, @var{packet_pts}, @var{packet_duration}, @var{packet_size}, 0x@var{CRC}
278 @end example
279
280 @var{CRC} is a hexadecimal number 0-padded to 8 digits containing the
281 CRC of the packet.
282
283 @subsection Examples
284
285 For example to compute the CRC of the audio and video frames in
286 @file{INPUT}, converted to raw audio and video packets, and store it
287 in the file @file{out.crc}:
288 @example
289 ffmpeg -i INPUT -f framecrc out.crc
290 @end example
291
292 To print the information to stdout, use the command:
293 @example
294 ffmpeg -i INPUT -f framecrc -
295 @end example
296
297 With @command{ffmpeg}, you can select the output format to which the
298 audio and video frames are encoded before computing the CRC for each
299 packet by specifying the audio and video codec. For example, to
300 compute the CRC of each decoded input audio frame converted to PCM
301 unsigned 8-bit and of each decoded input video frame converted to
302 MPEG-2 video, use the command:
303 @example
304 ffmpeg -i INPUT -c:a pcm_u8 -c:v mpeg2video -f framecrc -
305 @end example
306
307 See also the @ref{crc} muxer.
308
309 @anchor{framehash}
310 @section framehash
311
312 Per-packet hash testing format.
313
314 This muxer computes and prints a cryptographic hash for each audio
315 and video packet. This can be used for packet-by-packet equality
316 checks without having to individually do a binary comparison on each.
317
318 By default audio frames are converted to signed 16-bit raw audio and
319 video frames to raw video before computing the hash, but the output
320 of explicit conversions to other codecs can also be used. It uses the
321 SHA-256 cryptographic hash function by default, but supports several
322 other algorithms.
323
324 The output of the muxer consists of a line for each audio and video
325 packet of the form:
326 @example
327 @var{stream_index}, @var{packet_dts}, @var{packet_pts}, @var{packet_duration}, @var{packet_size}, @var{hash}
328 @end example
329
330 @var{hash} is a hexadecimal number representing the computed hash
331 for the packet.
332
333 @table @option
334 @item hash @var{algorithm}
335 Use the cryptographic hash function specified by the string @var{algorithm}.
336 Supported values include @code{MD5}, @code{murmur3}, @code{RIPEMD128},
337 @code{RIPEMD160}, @code{RIPEMD256}, @code{RIPEMD320}, @code{SHA160},
338 @code{SHA224}, @code{SHA256} (default), @code{SHA512/224}, @code{SHA512/256},
339 @code{SHA384}, @code{SHA512}, @code{CRC32} and @code{adler32}.
340
341 @end table
342
343 @subsection Examples
344
345 To compute the SHA-256 hash of the audio and video frames in @file{INPUT},
346 converted to raw audio and video packets, and store it in the file
347 @file{out.sha256}:
348 @example
349 ffmpeg -i INPUT -f framehash out.sha256
350 @end example
351
352 To print the information to stdout, using the MD5 hash function, use
353 the command:
354 @example
355 ffmpeg -i INPUT -f framehash -hash md5 -
356 @end example
357
358 See also the @ref{hash} muxer.
359
360 @anchor{framemd5}
361 @section framemd5
362
363 Per-packet MD5 testing format.
364
365 This is a variant of the @ref{framehash} muxer. Unlike that muxer,
366 it defaults to using the MD5 hash function.
367
368 @subsection Examples
369
370 To compute the MD5 hash of the audio and video frames in @file{INPUT},
371 converted to raw audio and video packets, and store it in the file
372 @file{out.md5}:
373 @example
374 ffmpeg -i INPUT -f framemd5 out.md5
375 @end example
376
377 To print the information to stdout, use the command:
378 @example
379 ffmpeg -i INPUT -f framemd5 -
380 @end example
381
382 See also the @ref{framehash} and @ref{md5} muxers.
383
384 @anchor{gif}
385 @section gif
386
387 Animated GIF muxer.
388
389 It accepts the following options:
390
391 @table @option
392 @item loop
393 Set the number of times to loop the output. Use @code{-1} for no loop, @code{0}
394 for looping indefinitely (default).
395
396 @item final_delay
397 Force the delay (expressed in centiseconds) after the last frame. Each frame
398 ends with a delay until the next frame. The default is @code{-1}, which is a
399 special value to tell the muxer to re-use the previous delay. In case of a
400 loop, you might want to customize this value to mark a pause for instance.
401 @end table
402
403 For example, to encode a gif looping 10 times, with a 5 seconds delay between
404 the loops:
405 @example
406 ffmpeg -i INPUT -loop 10 -final_delay 500 out.gif
407 @end example
408
409 Note 1: if you wish to extract the frames into separate GIF files, you need to
410 force the @ref{image2} muxer:
411 @example
412 ffmpeg -i INPUT -c:v gif -f image2 "out%d.gif"
413 @end example
414
415 Note 2: the GIF format has a very large time base: the delay between two frames
416 can therefore not be smaller than one centi second.
417
418 @anchor{hash}
419 @section hash
420
421 Hash testing format.
422
423 This muxer computes and prints a cryptographic hash of all the input
424 audio and video frames. This can be used for equality checks without
425 having to do a complete binary comparison.
426
427 By default audio frames are converted to signed 16-bit raw audio and
428 video frames to raw video before computing the hash, but the output
429 of explicit conversions to other codecs can also be used. Timestamps
430 are ignored. It uses the SHA-256 cryptographic hash function by default,
431 but supports several other algorithms.
432
433 The output of the muxer consists of a single line of the form:
434 @var{algo}=@var{hash}, where @var{algo} is a short string representing
435 the hash function used, and @var{hash} is a hexadecimal number
436 representing the computed hash.
437
438 @table @option
439 @item hash @var{algorithm}
440 Use the cryptographic hash function specified by the string @var{algorithm}.
441 Supported values include @code{MD5}, @code{murmur3}, @code{RIPEMD128},
442 @code{RIPEMD160}, @code{RIPEMD256}, @code{RIPEMD320}, @code{SHA160},
443 @code{SHA224}, @code{SHA256} (default), @code{SHA512/224}, @code{SHA512/256},
444 @code{SHA384}, @code{SHA512}, @code{CRC32} and @code{adler32}.
445
446 @end table
447
448 @subsection Examples
449
450 To compute the SHA-256 hash of the input converted to raw audio and
451 video, and store it in the file @file{out.sha256}:
452 @example
453 ffmpeg -i INPUT -f hash out.sha256
454 @end example
455
456 To print an MD5 hash to stdout use the command:
457 @example
458 ffmpeg -i INPUT -f hash -hash md5 -
459 @end example
460
461 See also the @ref{framehash} muxer.
462
463 @anchor{hls}
464 @section hls
465
466 Apple HTTP Live Streaming muxer that segments MPEG-TS according to
467 the HTTP Live Streaming (HLS) specification.
468
469 It creates a playlist file, and one or more segment files. The output filename
470 specifies the playlist filename.
471
472 By default, the muxer creates a file for each segment produced. These files
473 have the same name as the playlist, followed by a sequential number and a
474 .ts extension.
475
476 Make sure to require a closed GOP when encoding and to set the GOP
477 size to fit your segment time constraint.
478
479 For example, to convert an input file with @command{ffmpeg}:
480 @example
481 ffmpeg -i in.mkv -c:v h264 -flags +cgop -g 30 -hls_time 1 out.m3u8
482 @end example
483 This example will produce the playlist, @file{out.m3u8}, and segment files:
484 @file{out0.ts}, @file{out1.ts}, @file{out2.ts}, etc.
485
486 See also the @ref{segment} muxer, which provides a more generic and
487 flexible implementation of a segmenter, and can be used to perform HLS
488 segmentation.
489
490 @subsection Options
491
492 This muxer supports the following options:
493
494 @table @option
495 @item hls_init_time @var{seconds}
496 Set the initial target segment length in seconds. Default value is @var{0}.
497 Segment will be cut on the next key frame after this time has passed on the first m3u8 list.
498 After the initial playlist is filled @command{ffmpeg} will cut segments
499 at duration equal to @code{hls_time}
500
501 @item hls_time @var{seconds}
502 Set the target segment length in seconds. Default value is 2.
503 Segment will be cut on the next key frame after this time has passed.
504
505 @item hls_list_size @var{size}
506 Set the maximum number of playlist entries. If set to 0 the list file
507 will contain all the segments. Default value is 5.
508
509 @item hls_ts_options @var{options_list}
510 Set output format options using a :-separated list of key=value
511 parameters. Values containing @code{:} special characters must be
512 escaped.
513
514 @item hls_wrap @var{wrap}
515 This is a deprecated option, you can use @code{hls_list_size}
516 and @code{hls_flags delete_segments} instead it
517
518 This option is useful to avoid to fill the disk with many segment
519 files, and limits the maximum number of segment files written to disk
520 to @var{wrap}.
521
522
523 @item hls_start_number_source
524 Start the playlist sequence number (@code{#EXT-X-MEDIA-SEQUENCE}) according to the specified source.
525 Unless @code{hls_flags single_file} is set, it also specifies source of starting sequence numbers of
526 segment and subtitle filenames. In any case, if @code{hls_flags append_list}
527 is set and read playlist sequence number is greater than the specified start sequence number,
528 then that value will be used as start value.
529
530 It accepts the following values:
531
532 @table @option
533
534 @item generic (default)
535 Set the starting sequence numbers according to @var{start_number} option value.
536
537 @item epoch
538 The start number will be the seconds since epoch (1970-01-01 00:00:00)
539
540 @item datetime
541 The start number will be based on the current date/time as YYYYmmddHHMMSS. e.g. 20161231235759.
542
543 @end table
544
545 @item start_number @var{number}
546 Start the playlist sequence number (@code{#EXT-X-MEDIA-SEQUENCE}) from the specified @var{number}
547 when @var{hls_start_number_source} value is @var{generic}. (This is the default case.)
548 Unless @code{hls_flags single_file} is set, it also specifies starting sequence numbers of segment and subtitle filenames.
549 Default value is 0.
550
551 @item hls_allow_cache @var{allowcache}
552 Explicitly set whether the client MAY (1) or MUST NOT (0) cache media segments.
553
554 @item hls_base_url @var{baseurl}
555 Append @var{baseurl} to every entry in the playlist.
556 Useful to generate playlists with absolute paths.
557
558 Note that the playlist sequence number must be unique for each segment
559 and it is not to be confused with the segment filename sequence number
560 which can be cyclic, for example if the @option{wrap} option is
561 specified.
562
563 @item hls_segment_filename @var{filename}
564 Set the segment filename. Unless @code{hls_flags single_file} is set,
565 @var{filename} is used as a string format with the segment number:
566 @example
567 ffmpeg -i in.nut -hls_segment_filename 'file%03d.ts' out.m3u8
568 @end example
569 This example will produce the playlist, @file{out.m3u8}, and segment files:
570 @file{file000.ts}, @file{file001.ts}, @file{file002.ts}, etc.
571
572 @var{filename} may contain full path or relative path specification,
573 but only the file name part without any path info will be contained in the m3u8 segment list.
574 Should a relative path be specified, the path of the created segment
575 files will be relative to the current working directory.
576 When use_localtime_mkdir is set, the whole expanded value of @var{filename} will be written into the m3u8 segment list.
577
578
579 @item use_localtime
580 Use strftime() on @var{filename} to expand the segment filename with localtime.
581 The segment number is also available in this mode, but to use it, you need to specify second_level_segment_index
582 hls_flag and %%d will be the specifier.
583 @example
584 ffmpeg -i in.nut -use_localtime 1 -hls_segment_filename 'file-%Y%m%d-%s.ts' out.m3u8
585 @end example
586 This example will produce the playlist, @file{out.m3u8}, and segment files:
587 @file{file-20160215-1455569023.ts}, @file{file-20160215-1455569024.ts}, etc.
588 Note: On some systems/environments, the @code{%s} specifier is not available. See
589   @code{strftime()} documentation.
590 @example
591 ffmpeg -i in.nut -use_localtime 1 -hls_flags second_level_segment_index -hls_segment_filename 'file-%Y%m%d-%%04d.ts' out.m3u8
592 @end example
593 This example will produce the playlist, @file{out.m3u8}, and segment files:
594 @file{file-20160215-0001.ts}, @file{file-20160215-0002.ts}, etc.
595
596 @item use_localtime_mkdir
597 Used together with -use_localtime, it will create all subdirectories which
598 is expanded in @var{filename}.
599 @example
600 ffmpeg -i in.nut -use_localtime 1 -use_localtime_mkdir 1 -hls_segment_filename '%Y%m%d/file-%Y%m%d-%s.ts' out.m3u8
601 @end example
602 This example will create a directory 201560215 (if it does not exist), and then
603 produce the playlist, @file{out.m3u8}, and segment files:
604 @file{20160215/file-20160215-1455569023.ts}, @file{20160215/file-20160215-1455569024.ts}, etc.
605
606 @example
607 ffmpeg -i in.nut -use_localtime 1 -use_localtime_mkdir 1 -hls_segment_filename '%Y/%m/%d/file-%Y%m%d-%s.ts' out.m3u8
608 @end example
609 This example will create a directory hierarchy 2016/02/15 (if any of them do not exist), and then
610 produce the playlist, @file{out.m3u8}, and segment files:
611 @file{2016/02/15/file-20160215-1455569023.ts}, @file{2016/02/15/file-20160215-1455569024.ts}, etc.
612
613
614 @item hls_key_info_file @var{key_info_file}
615 Use the information in @var{key_info_file} for segment encryption. The first
616 line of @var{key_info_file} specifies the key URI written to the playlist. The
617 key URL is used to access the encryption key during playback. The second line
618 specifies the path to the key file used to obtain the key during the encryption
619 process. The key file is read as a single packed array of 16 octets in binary
620 format. The optional third line specifies the initialization vector (IV) as a
621 hexadecimal string to be used instead of the segment sequence number (default)
622 for encryption. Changes to @var{key_info_file} will result in segment
623 encryption with the new key/IV and an entry in the playlist for the new key
624 URI/IV if @code{hls_flags periodic_rekey} is enabled.
625
626 Key info file format:
627 @example
628 @var{key URI}
629 @var{key file path}
630 @var{IV} (optional)
631 @end example
632
633 Example key URIs:
634 @example
635 http://server/file.key
636 /path/to/file.key
637 file.key
638 @end example
639
640 Example key file paths:
641 @example
642 file.key
643 /path/to/file.key
644 @end example
645
646 Example IV:
647 @example
648 0123456789ABCDEF0123456789ABCDEF
649 @end example
650
651 Key info file example:
652 @example
653 http://server/file.key
654 /path/to/file.key
655 0123456789ABCDEF0123456789ABCDEF
656 @end example
657
658 Example shell script:
659 @example
660 #!/bin/sh
661 BASE_URL=$@{1:-'.'@}
662 openssl rand 16 > file.key
663 echo $BASE_URL/file.key > file.keyinfo
664 echo file.key >> file.keyinfo
665 echo $(openssl rand -hex 16) >> file.keyinfo
666 ffmpeg -f lavfi -re -i testsrc -c:v h264 -hls_flags delete_segments \
667   -hls_key_info_file file.keyinfo out.m3u8
668 @end example
669
670 @item -hls_enc @var{enc}
671 Enable (1) or disable (0) the AES128 encryption.
672 When enabled every segment generated is encrypted and the encryption key
673 is saved as @var{playlist name}.key.
674
675 @item -hls_enc_key @var{key}
676 Hex-coded 16byte key to encrypt the segments, by default it
677 is randomly generated.
678
679 @item -hls_enc_key_url @var{keyurl}
680 If set, @var{keyurl} is prepended instead of @var{baseurl} to the key filename
681 in the playlist.
682
683 @item -hls_enc_iv @var{iv}
684 Hex-coded 16byte initialization vector for every segment instead
685 of the autogenerated ones.
686
687 @item hls_segment_type @var{flags}
688 Possible values:
689
690 @table @samp
691 @item mpegts
692 If this flag is set, the hls segment files will format to mpegts.
693 the mpegts files is used in all hls versions.
694
695 @item fmp4
696 If this flag is set, the hls segment files will format to fragment mp4 looks like dash.
697 the fmp4 files is used in hls after version 7.
698
699 @end table
700
701 @item hls_fmp4_init_filename @var{filename}
702 set filename to the fragment files header file, default filename is @file{init.mp4}.
703
704 @item hls_flags @var{flags}
705 Possible values:
706
707 @table @samp
708 @item single_file
709 If this flag is set, the muxer will store all segments in a single MPEG-TS
710 file, and will use byte ranges in the playlist. HLS playlists generated with
711 this way will have the version number 4.
712 For example:
713 @example
714 ffmpeg -i in.nut -hls_flags single_file out.m3u8
715 @end example
716 Will produce the playlist, @file{out.m3u8}, and a single segment file,
717 @file{out.ts}.
718
719 @item delete_segments
720 Segment files removed from the playlist are deleted after a period of time
721 equal to the duration of the segment plus the duration of the playlist.
722
723 @item append_list
724 Append new segments into the end of old segment list,
725 and remove the @code{#EXT-X-ENDLIST} from the old segment list.
726
727 @item round_durations
728 Round the duration info in the playlist file segment info to integer
729 values, instead of using floating point.
730
731 @item discont_start
732 Add the @code{#EXT-X-DISCONTINUITY} tag to the playlist, before the
733 first segment's information.
734
735 @item omit_endlist
736 Do not append the @code{EXT-X-ENDLIST} tag at the end of the playlist.
737
738 @item periodic_rekey
739 The file specified by @code{hls_key_info_file} will be checked periodically and
740 detect updates to the encryption info. Be sure to replace this file atomically,
741 including the file containing the AES encryption key.
742
743 @item independent_segments
744 Add the @code{#EXT-X-INDEPENDENT-SEGMENTS} to playlists that has video segments
745 and when all the segments of that playlist are guaranteed to start with a Key frame.
746
747 @item split_by_time
748 Allow segments to start on frames other than keyframes. This improves
749 behavior on some players when the time between keyframes is inconsistent,
750 but may make things worse on others, and can cause some oddities during
751 seeking. This flag should be used with the @code{hls_time} option.
752
753 @item program_date_time
754 Generate @code{EXT-X-PROGRAM-DATE-TIME} tags.
755
756 @item second_level_segment_index
757 Makes it possible to use segment indexes as %%d in hls_segment_filename expression
758 besides date/time values when use_localtime is on.
759 To get fixed width numbers with trailing zeroes, %%0xd format is available where x is the required width.
760
761 @item second_level_segment_size
762 Makes it possible to use segment sizes (counted in bytes) as %%s in hls_segment_filename
763 expression besides date/time values when use_localtime is on.
764 To get fixed width numbers with trailing zeroes, %%0xs format is available where x is the required width.
765
766 @item second_level_segment_duration
767 Makes it possible to use segment duration (calculated  in microseconds) as %%t in hls_segment_filename
768 expression besides date/time values when use_localtime is on.
769 To get fixed width numbers with trailing zeroes, %%0xt format is available where x is the required width.
770
771 @example
772 ffmpeg -i sample.mpeg \
773    -f hls -hls_time 3 -hls_list_size 5 \
774    -hls_flags second_level_segment_index+second_level_segment_size+second_level_segment_duration \
775    -use_localtime 1 -use_localtime_mkdir 1 -hls_segment_filename "segment_%Y%m%d%H%M%S_%%04d_%%08s_%%013t.ts" stream.m3u8
776 @end example
777 This will produce segments like this:
778 @file{segment_20170102194334_0003_00122200_0000003000000.ts}, @file{segment_20170102194334_0004_00120072_0000003000000.ts} etc.
779
780 @item temp_file
781 Write segment data to filename.tmp and rename to filename only once the segment is complete. A webserver
782 serving up segments can be configured to reject requests to *.tmp to prevent access to in-progress segments
783 before they have been added to the m3u8 playlist.
784
785 @end table
786
787 @item hls_playlist_type event
788 Emit @code{#EXT-X-PLAYLIST-TYPE:EVENT} in the m3u8 header. Forces
789 @option{hls_list_size} to 0; the playlist can only be appended to.
790
791 @item hls_playlist_type vod
792 Emit @code{#EXT-X-PLAYLIST-TYPE:VOD} in the m3u8 header. Forces
793 @option{hls_list_size} to 0; the playlist must not change.
794
795 @item method
796 Use the given HTTP method to create the hls files.
797 @example
798 ffmpeg -re -i in.ts -f hls -method PUT http://example.com/live/out.m3u8
799 @end example
800 This example will upload all the mpegts segment files to the HTTP
801 server using the HTTP PUT method, and update the m3u8 files every
802 @code{refresh} times using the same method.
803 Note that the HTTP server must support the given method for uploading
804 files.
805
806 @item http_user_agent
807 Override User-Agent field in HTTP header. Applicable only for HTTP output.
808
809 @item var_stream_map
810 Map string which specifies how to group the audio, video and subtitle streams
811 into different variant streams. The variant stream groups are separated
812 by space.
813 Expected string format is like this "a:0,v:0 a:1,v:1 ....". Here a:, v:, s: are
814 the keys to specify audio, video and subtitle streams respectively.
815 Allowed values are 0 to 9 (limited just based on practical usage).
816
817 @example
818 ffmpeg -re -i in.ts -b:v:0 1000k -b:v:1 256k -b:a:0 64k -b:a:1 32k \
819   -map 0:v -map 0:a -map 0:v -map 0:a -f hls -var_stream_map "v:0,a:0 v:1,a:1" \
820   http://example.com/live/out.m3u8
821 @end example
822 This example creates two hls variant streams. The first variant stream will
823 contain video stream of bitrate 1000k and audio stream of bitrate 64k and the
824 second variant stream will contain video stream of bitrate 256k and audio
825 stream of bitrate 32k. Here, two media playlist with file names out_1.m3u8 and
826 out_2.m3u8 will be created.
827 @example
828 ffmpeg -re -i in.ts -b:v:0 1000k -b:v:1 256k -b:a:0 64k \
829   -map 0:v -map 0:a -map 0:v -f hls -var_stream_map "v:0 a:0 v:1" \
830   http://example.com/live/out.m3u8
831 @end example
832 This example creates three hls variant streams. The first variant stream will
833 be a video only stream with video bitrate 1000k, the second variant stream will
834 be an audio only stream with bitrate 64k and the third variant stream will be a
835 video only stream with bitrate 256k. Here, three media playlist with file names
836 out_1.m3u8, out_2.m3u8 and out_3.m3u8 will be created.
837 @example
838 ffmpeg -re -i in.ts -b:a:0 32k -b:a:1 64k -b:v:0 1000k -b:v:1 3000k  \
839   -map 0:a -map 0:a -map 0:v -map 0:v -f hls \
840   -var_stream_map "a:0,agroup:aud_low a:1,agroup:aud_high v:0,agroup:aud_low v:1,agroup:aud_high" \
841   -master_pl_name master.m3u8 \
842   http://example.com/live/out.m3u8
843 @end example
844 This example creates two audio only and two video only variant streams. In
845 addition to the #EXT-X-STREAM-INF tag for each variant stream in the master
846 playlist, #EXT-X-MEDIA tag is also added for the two audio only variant streams
847 and they are mapped to the two video only variant streams with audio group names
848 'aud_low' and 'aud_high'.
849
850 By default, a single hls variant containing all the encoded streams is created.
851
852 @item master_pl_name
853 Create HLS master playlist with the given name.
854
855 @example
856 ffmpeg -re -i in.ts -f hls -master_pl_name master.m3u8 http://example.com/live/out.m3u8
857 @end example
858 This example creates HLS master playlist with name master.m3u8 and it is
859 published at http://example.com/live/
860
861 @item master_pl_publish_rate
862 Publish master play list repeatedly every after specified number of segment intervals.
863
864 @example
865 ffmpeg -re -i in.ts -f hls -master_pl_name master.m3u8 \
866 -hls_time 2 -master_pl_publish_rate 30 http://example.com/live/out.m3u8
867 @end example
868
869 This example creates HLS master playlist with name master.m3u8 and keep
870 publishing it repeatedly every after 30 segments i.e. every after 60s.
871
872 @item http_persistent
873 Use persistent HTTP connections. Applicable only for HTTP output.
874
875 @end table
876
877 @anchor{ico}
878 @section ico
879
880 ICO file muxer.
881
882 Microsoft's icon file format (ICO) has some strict limitations that should be noted:
883
884 @itemize
885 @item
886 Size cannot exceed 256 pixels in any dimension
887
888 @item
889 Only BMP and PNG images can be stored
890
891 @item
892 If a BMP image is used, it must be one of the following pixel formats:
893 @example
894 BMP Bit Depth      FFmpeg Pixel Format
895 1bit               pal8
896 4bit               pal8
897 8bit               pal8
898 16bit              rgb555le
899 24bit              bgr24
900 32bit              bgra
901 @end example
902
903 @item
904 If a BMP image is used, it must use the BITMAPINFOHEADER DIB header
905
906 @item
907 If a PNG image is used, it must use the rgba pixel format
908 @end itemize
909
910 @anchor{image2}
911 @section image2
912
913 Image file muxer.
914
915 The image file muxer writes video frames to image files.
916
917 The output filenames are specified by a pattern, which can be used to
918 produce sequentially numbered series of files.
919 The pattern may contain the string "%d" or "%0@var{N}d", this string
920 specifies the position of the characters representing a numbering in
921 the filenames. If the form "%0@var{N}d" is used, the string
922 representing the number in each filename is 0-padded to @var{N}
923 digits. The literal character '%' can be specified in the pattern with
924 the string "%%".
925
926 If the pattern contains "%d" or "%0@var{N}d", the first filename of
927 the file list specified will contain the number 1, all the following
928 numbers will be sequential.
929
930 The pattern may contain a suffix which is used to automatically
931 determine the format of the image files to write.
932
933 For example the pattern "img-%03d.bmp" will specify a sequence of
934 filenames of the form @file{img-001.bmp}, @file{img-002.bmp}, ...,
935 @file{img-010.bmp}, etc.
936 The pattern "img%%-%d.jpg" will specify a sequence of filenames of the
937 form @file{img%-1.jpg}, @file{img%-2.jpg}, ..., @file{img%-10.jpg},
938 etc.
939
940 @subsection Examples
941
942 The following example shows how to use @command{ffmpeg} for creating a
943 sequence of files @file{img-001.jpeg}, @file{img-002.jpeg}, ...,
944 taking one image every second from the input video:
945 @example
946 ffmpeg -i in.avi -vsync cfr -r 1 -f image2 'img-%03d.jpeg'
947 @end example
948
949 Note that with @command{ffmpeg}, if the format is not specified with the
950 @code{-f} option and the output filename specifies an image file
951 format, the image2 muxer is automatically selected, so the previous
952 command can be written as:
953 @example
954 ffmpeg -i in.avi -vsync cfr -r 1 'img-%03d.jpeg'
955 @end example
956
957 Note also that the pattern must not necessarily contain "%d" or
958 "%0@var{N}d", for example to create a single image file
959 @file{img.jpeg} from the start of the input video you can employ the command:
960 @example
961 ffmpeg -i in.avi -f image2 -frames:v 1 img.jpeg
962 @end example
963
964 The @option{strftime} option allows you to expand the filename with
965 date and time information. Check the documentation of
966 the @code{strftime()} function for the syntax.
967
968 For example to generate image files from the @code{strftime()}
969 "%Y-%m-%d_%H-%M-%S" pattern, the following @command{ffmpeg} command
970 can be used:
971 @example
972 ffmpeg -f v4l2 -r 1 -i /dev/video0 -f image2 -strftime 1 "%Y-%m-%d_%H-%M-%S.jpg"
973 @end example
974
975 You can set the file name with current frame's PTS:
976 @example
977 ffmpeg -f v4l2 -r 1 -i /dev/video0 -copyts -f image2 -frame_pts true %d.jpg"
978 @end example
979
980 @subsection Options
981
982 @table @option
983 @item frame_pts
984 If set to 1, expand the filename with pts from pkt->pts.
985 Default value is 0.
986
987 @item start_number
988 Start the sequence from the specified number. Default value is 1.
989
990 @item update
991 If set to 1, the filename will always be interpreted as just a
992 filename, not a pattern, and the corresponding file will be continuously
993 overwritten with new images. Default value is 0.
994
995 @item strftime
996 If set to 1, expand the filename with date and time information from
997 @code{strftime()}. Default value is 0.
998 @end table
999
1000 The image muxer supports the .Y.U.V image file format. This format is
1001 special in that that each image frame consists of three files, for
1002 each of the YUV420P components. To read or write this image file format,
1003 specify the name of the '.Y' file. The muxer will automatically open the
1004 '.U' and '.V' files as required.
1005
1006 @section matroska
1007
1008 Matroska container muxer.
1009
1010 This muxer implements the matroska and webm container specs.
1011
1012 @subsection Metadata
1013
1014 The recognized metadata settings in this muxer are:
1015
1016 @table @option
1017 @item title
1018 Set title name provided to a single track.
1019
1020 @item language
1021 Specify the language of the track in the Matroska languages form.
1022
1023 The language can be either the 3 letters bibliographic ISO-639-2 (ISO
1024 639-2/B) form (like "fre" for French), or a language code mixed with a
1025 country code for specialities in languages (like "fre-ca" for Canadian
1026 French).
1027
1028 @item stereo_mode
1029 Set stereo 3D video layout of two views in a single video track.
1030
1031 The following values are recognized:
1032 @table @samp
1033 @item mono
1034 video is not stereo
1035 @item left_right
1036 Both views are arranged side by side, Left-eye view is on the left
1037 @item bottom_top
1038 Both views are arranged in top-bottom orientation, Left-eye view is at bottom
1039 @item top_bottom
1040 Both views are arranged in top-bottom orientation, Left-eye view is on top
1041 @item checkerboard_rl
1042 Each view is arranged in a checkerboard interleaved pattern, Left-eye view being first
1043 @item checkerboard_lr
1044 Each view is arranged in a checkerboard interleaved pattern, Right-eye view being first
1045 @item row_interleaved_rl
1046 Each view is constituted by a row based interleaving, Right-eye view is first row
1047 @item row_interleaved_lr
1048 Each view is constituted by a row based interleaving, Left-eye view is first row
1049 @item col_interleaved_rl
1050 Both views are arranged in a column based interleaving manner, Right-eye view is first column
1051 @item col_interleaved_lr
1052 Both views are arranged in a column based interleaving manner, Left-eye view is first column
1053 @item anaglyph_cyan_red
1054 All frames are in anaglyph format viewable through red-cyan filters
1055 @item right_left
1056 Both views are arranged side by side, Right-eye view is on the left
1057 @item anaglyph_green_magenta
1058 All frames are in anaglyph format viewable through green-magenta filters
1059 @item block_lr
1060 Both eyes laced in one Block, Left-eye view is first
1061 @item block_rl
1062 Both eyes laced in one Block, Right-eye view is first
1063 @end table
1064 @end table
1065
1066 For example a 3D WebM clip can be created using the following command line:
1067 @example
1068 ffmpeg -i sample_left_right_clip.mpg -an -c:v libvpx -metadata stereo_mode=left_right -y stereo_clip.webm
1069 @end example
1070
1071 @subsection Options
1072
1073 This muxer supports the following options:
1074
1075 @table @option
1076 @item reserve_index_space
1077 By default, this muxer writes the index for seeking (called cues in Matroska
1078 terms) at the end of the file, because it cannot know in advance how much space
1079 to leave for the index at the beginning of the file. However for some use cases
1080 -- e.g.  streaming where seeking is possible but slow -- it is useful to put the
1081 index at the beginning of the file.
1082
1083 If this option is set to a non-zero value, the muxer will reserve a given amount
1084 of space in the file header and then try to write the cues there when the muxing
1085 finishes. If the available space does not suffice, muxing will fail. A safe size
1086 for most use cases should be about 50kB per hour of video.
1087
1088 Note that cues are only written if the output is seekable and this option will
1089 have no effect if it is not.
1090 @end table
1091
1092 @anchor{md5}
1093 @section md5
1094
1095 MD5 testing format.
1096
1097 This is a variant of the @ref{hash} muxer. Unlike that muxer, it
1098 defaults to using the MD5 hash function.
1099
1100 @subsection Examples
1101
1102 To compute the MD5 hash of the input converted to raw
1103 audio and video, and store it in the file @file{out.md5}:
1104 @example
1105 ffmpeg -i INPUT -f md5 out.md5
1106 @end example
1107
1108 You can print the MD5 to stdout with the command:
1109 @example
1110 ffmpeg -i INPUT -f md5 -
1111 @end example
1112
1113 See also the @ref{hash} and @ref{framemd5} muxers.
1114
1115 @section mov, mp4, ismv
1116
1117 MOV/MP4/ISMV (Smooth Streaming) muxer.
1118
1119 The mov/mp4/ismv muxer supports fragmentation. Normally, a MOV/MP4
1120 file has all the metadata about all packets stored in one location
1121 (written at the end of the file, it can be moved to the start for
1122 better playback by adding @var{faststart} to the @var{movflags}, or
1123 using the @command{qt-faststart} tool). A fragmented
1124 file consists of a number of fragments, where packets and metadata
1125 about these packets are stored together. Writing a fragmented
1126 file has the advantage that the file is decodable even if the
1127 writing is interrupted (while a normal MOV/MP4 is undecodable if
1128 it is not properly finished), and it requires less memory when writing
1129 very long files (since writing normal MOV/MP4 files stores info about
1130 every single packet in memory until the file is closed). The downside
1131 is that it is less compatible with other applications.
1132
1133 @subsection Options
1134
1135 Fragmentation is enabled by setting one of the AVOptions that define
1136 how to cut the file into fragments:
1137
1138 @table @option
1139 @item -moov_size @var{bytes}
1140 Reserves space for the moov atom at the beginning of the file instead of placing the
1141 moov atom at the end. If the space reserved is insufficient, muxing will fail.
1142 @item -movflags frag_keyframe
1143 Start a new fragment at each video keyframe.
1144 @item -frag_duration @var{duration}
1145 Create fragments that are @var{duration} microseconds long.
1146 @item -frag_size @var{size}
1147 Create fragments that contain up to @var{size} bytes of payload data.
1148 @item -movflags frag_custom
1149 Allow the caller to manually choose when to cut fragments, by
1150 calling @code{av_write_frame(ctx, NULL)} to write a fragment with
1151 the packets written so far. (This is only useful with other
1152 applications integrating libavformat, not from @command{ffmpeg}.)
1153 @item -min_frag_duration @var{duration}
1154 Don't create fragments that are shorter than @var{duration} microseconds long.
1155 @end table
1156
1157 If more than one condition is specified, fragments are cut when
1158 one of the specified conditions is fulfilled. The exception to this is
1159 @code{-min_frag_duration}, which has to be fulfilled for any of the other
1160 conditions to apply.
1161
1162 Additionally, the way the output file is written can be adjusted
1163 through a few other options:
1164
1165 @table @option
1166 @item -movflags empty_moov
1167 Write an initial moov atom directly at the start of the file, without
1168 describing any samples in it. Generally, an mdat/moov pair is written
1169 at the start of the file, as a normal MOV/MP4 file, containing only
1170 a short portion of the file. With this option set, there is no initial
1171 mdat atom, and the moov atom only describes the tracks but has
1172 a zero duration.
1173
1174 This option is implicitly set when writing ismv (Smooth Streaming) files.
1175 @item -movflags separate_moof
1176 Write a separate moof (movie fragment) atom for each track. Normally,
1177 packets for all tracks are written in a moof atom (which is slightly
1178 more efficient), but with this option set, the muxer writes one moof/mdat
1179 pair for each track, making it easier to separate tracks.
1180
1181 This option is implicitly set when writing ismv (Smooth Streaming) files.
1182 @item -movflags faststart
1183 Run a second pass moving the index (moov atom) to the beginning of the file.
1184 This operation can take a while, and will not work in various situations such
1185 as fragmented output, thus it is not enabled by default.
1186 @item -movflags rtphint
1187 Add RTP hinting tracks to the output file.
1188 @item -movflags disable_chpl
1189 Disable Nero chapter markers (chpl atom).  Normally, both Nero chapters
1190 and a QuickTime chapter track are written to the file. With this option
1191 set, only the QuickTime chapter track will be written. Nero chapters can
1192 cause failures when the file is reprocessed with certain tagging programs, like
1193 mp3Tag 2.61a and iTunes 11.3, most likely other versions are affected as well.
1194 @item -movflags omit_tfhd_offset
1195 Do not write any absolute base_data_offset in tfhd atoms. This avoids
1196 tying fragments to absolute byte positions in the file/streams.
1197 @item -movflags default_base_moof
1198 Similarly to the omit_tfhd_offset, this flag avoids writing the
1199 absolute base_data_offset field in tfhd atoms, but does so by using
1200 the new default-base-is-moof flag instead. This flag is new from
1201 14496-12:2012. This may make the fragments easier to parse in certain
1202 circumstances (avoiding basing track fragment location calculations
1203 on the implicit end of the previous track fragment).
1204 @item -write_tmcd
1205 Specify @code{on} to force writing a timecode track, @code{off} to disable it
1206 and @code{auto} to write a timecode track only for mov and mp4 output (default).
1207 @item -movflags negative_cts_offsets
1208 Enables utilization of version 1 of the CTTS box, in which the CTS offsets can
1209 be negative. This enables the initial sample to have DTS/CTS of zero, and
1210 reduces the need for edit lists for some cases such as video tracks with
1211 B-frames. Additionally, eases conformance with the DASH-IF interoperability
1212 guidelines.
1213 @end table
1214
1215 @subsection Example
1216
1217 Smooth Streaming content can be pushed in real time to a publishing
1218 point on IIS with this muxer. Example:
1219 @example
1220 ffmpeg -re @var{<normal input/transcoding options>} -movflags isml+frag_keyframe -f ismv http://server/publishingpoint.isml/Streams(Encoder1)
1221 @end example
1222
1223 @subsection Audible AAX
1224
1225 Audible AAX files are encrypted M4B files, and they can be decrypted by specifying a 4 byte activation secret.
1226 @example
1227 ffmpeg -activation_bytes 1CEB00DA -i test.aax -vn -c:a copy output.mp4
1228 @end example
1229
1230 @section mp3
1231
1232 The MP3 muxer writes a raw MP3 stream with the following optional features:
1233 @itemize @bullet
1234 @item
1235 An ID3v2 metadata header at the beginning (enabled by default). Versions 2.3 and
1236 2.4 are supported, the @code{id3v2_version} private option controls which one is
1237 used (3 or 4). Setting @code{id3v2_version} to 0 disables the ID3v2 header
1238 completely.
1239
1240 The muxer supports writing attached pictures (APIC frames) to the ID3v2 header.
1241 The pictures are supplied to the muxer in form of a video stream with a single
1242 packet. There can be any number of those streams, each will correspond to a
1243 single APIC frame.  The stream metadata tags @var{title} and @var{comment} map
1244 to APIC @var{description} and @var{picture type} respectively. See
1245 @url{http://id3.org/id3v2.4.0-frames} for allowed picture types.
1246
1247 Note that the APIC frames must be written at the beginning, so the muxer will
1248 buffer the audio frames until it gets all the pictures. It is therefore advised
1249 to provide the pictures as soon as possible to avoid excessive buffering.
1250
1251 @item
1252 A Xing/LAME frame right after the ID3v2 header (if present). It is enabled by
1253 default, but will be written only if the output is seekable. The
1254 @code{write_xing} private option can be used to disable it.  The frame contains
1255 various information that may be useful to the decoder, like the audio duration
1256 or encoder delay.
1257
1258 @item
1259 A legacy ID3v1 tag at the end of the file (disabled by default). It may be
1260 enabled with the @code{write_id3v1} private option, but as its capabilities are
1261 very limited, its usage is not recommended.
1262 @end itemize
1263
1264 Examples:
1265
1266 Write an mp3 with an ID3v2.3 header and an ID3v1 footer:
1267 @example
1268 ffmpeg -i INPUT -id3v2_version 3 -write_id3v1 1 out.mp3
1269 @end example
1270
1271 To attach a picture to an mp3 file select both the audio and the picture stream
1272 with @code{map}:
1273 @example
1274 ffmpeg -i input.mp3 -i cover.png -c copy -map 0 -map 1
1275 -metadata:s:v title="Album cover" -metadata:s:v comment="Cover (Front)" out.mp3
1276 @end example
1277
1278 Write a "clean" MP3 without any extra features:
1279 @example
1280 ffmpeg -i input.wav -write_xing 0 -id3v2_version 0 out.mp3
1281 @end example
1282
1283 @section mpegts
1284
1285 MPEG transport stream muxer.
1286
1287 This muxer implements ISO 13818-1 and part of ETSI EN 300 468.
1288
1289 The recognized metadata settings in mpegts muxer are @code{service_provider}
1290 and @code{service_name}. If they are not set the default for
1291 @code{service_provider} is @samp{FFmpeg} and the default for
1292 @code{service_name} is @samp{Service01}.
1293
1294 @subsection Options
1295
1296 The muxer options are:
1297
1298 @table @option
1299 @item mpegts_transport_stream_id @var{integer}
1300 Set the @samp{transport_stream_id}. This identifies a transponder in DVB.
1301 Default is @code{0x0001}.
1302
1303 @item mpegts_original_network_id @var{integer}
1304 Set the @samp{original_network_id}. This is unique identifier of a
1305 network in DVB. Its main use is in the unique identification of a service
1306 through the path @samp{Original_Network_ID, Transport_Stream_ID}. Default
1307 is @code{0x0001}.
1308
1309 @item mpegts_service_id @var{integer}
1310 Set the @samp{service_id}, also known as program in DVB. Default is
1311 @code{0x0001}.
1312
1313 @item mpegts_service_type @var{integer}
1314 Set the program @samp{service_type}. Default is @code{digital_tv}.
1315 Accepts the following options:
1316 @table @samp
1317 @item hex_value
1318 Any hexdecimal value between @code{0x01} to @code{0xff} as defined in
1319 ETSI 300 468.
1320 @item digital_tv
1321 Digital TV service.
1322 @item digital_radio
1323 Digital Radio service.
1324 @item teletext
1325 Teletext service.
1326 @item advanced_codec_digital_radio
1327 Advanced Codec Digital Radio service.
1328 @item mpeg2_digital_hdtv
1329 MPEG2 Digital HDTV service.
1330 @item advanced_codec_digital_sdtv
1331 Advanced Codec Digital SDTV service.
1332 @item advanced_codec_digital_hdtv
1333 Advanced Codec Digital HDTV service.
1334 @end table
1335
1336 @item mpegts_pmt_start_pid @var{integer}
1337 Set the first PID for PMT. Default is @code{0x1000}. Max is @code{0x1f00}.
1338
1339 @item mpegts_start_pid @var{integer}
1340 Set the first PID for data packets. Default is @code{0x0100}. Max is
1341 @code{0x0f00}.
1342
1343 @item mpegts_m2ts_mode @var{boolean}
1344 Enable m2ts mode if set to @code{1}. Default value is @code{-1} which
1345 disables m2ts mode.
1346
1347 @item muxrate @var{integer}
1348 Set a constant muxrate. Default is VBR.
1349
1350 @item pes_payload_size @var{integer}
1351 Set minimum PES packet payload in bytes. Default is @code{2930}.
1352
1353 @item mpegts_flags @var{flags}
1354 Set mpegts flags. Accepts the following options:
1355 @table @samp
1356 @item resend_headers
1357 Reemit PAT/PMT before writing the next packet.
1358 @item latm
1359 Use LATM packetization for AAC.
1360 @item pat_pmt_at_frames
1361 Reemit PAT and PMT at each video frame.
1362 @item system_b
1363 Conform to System B (DVB) instead of System A (ATSC).
1364 @item initial_discontinuity
1365 Mark the initial packet of each stream as discontinuity.
1366 @end table
1367
1368 @item resend_headers @var{integer}
1369 Reemit PAT/PMT before writing the next packet. This option is deprecated:
1370 use @option{mpegts_flags} instead.
1371
1372 @item mpegts_copyts @var{boolean}
1373 Preserve original timestamps, if value is set to @code{1}. Default value
1374 is @code{-1}, which results in shifting timestamps so that they start from 0.
1375
1376 @item omit_video_pes_length @var{boolean}
1377 Omit the PES packet length for video packets. Default is @code{1} (true).
1378
1379 @item pcr_period @var{integer}
1380 Override the default PCR retransmission time in milliseconds. Ignored if
1381 variable muxrate is selected. Default is @code{20}.
1382
1383 @item pat_period @var{double}
1384 Maximum time in seconds between PAT/PMT tables.
1385
1386 @item sdt_period @var{double}
1387 Maximum time in seconds between SDT tables.
1388
1389 @item tables_version @var{integer}
1390 Set PAT, PMT and SDT version (default @code{0}, valid values are from 0 to 31, inclusively).
1391 This option allows updating stream structure so that standard consumer may
1392 detect the change. To do so, reopen output @code{AVFormatContext} (in case of API
1393 usage) or restart @command{ffmpeg} instance, cyclically changing
1394 @option{tables_version} value:
1395
1396 @example
1397 ffmpeg -i source1.ts -codec copy -f mpegts -tables_version 0 udp://1.1.1.1:1111
1398 ffmpeg -i source2.ts -codec copy -f mpegts -tables_version 1 udp://1.1.1.1:1111
1399 ...
1400 ffmpeg -i source3.ts -codec copy -f mpegts -tables_version 31 udp://1.1.1.1:1111
1401 ffmpeg -i source1.ts -codec copy -f mpegts -tables_version 0 udp://1.1.1.1:1111
1402 ffmpeg -i source2.ts -codec copy -f mpegts -tables_version 1 udp://1.1.1.1:1111
1403 ...
1404 @end example
1405 @end table
1406
1407 @subsection Example
1408
1409 @example
1410 ffmpeg -i file.mpg -c copy \
1411      -mpegts_original_network_id 0x1122 \
1412      -mpegts_transport_stream_id 0x3344 \
1413      -mpegts_service_id 0x5566 \
1414      -mpegts_pmt_start_pid 0x1500 \
1415      -mpegts_start_pid 0x150 \
1416      -metadata service_provider="Some provider" \
1417      -metadata service_name="Some Channel" \
1418      out.ts
1419 @end example
1420
1421 @section mxf, mxf_d10
1422
1423 MXF muxer.
1424
1425 @subsection Options
1426
1427 The muxer options are:
1428
1429 @table @option
1430 @item store_user_comments @var{bool}
1431 Set if user comments should be stored if available or never.
1432 IRT D-10 does not allow user comments. The default is thus to write them for
1433 mxf but not for mxf_d10
1434 @end table
1435
1436 @section null
1437
1438 Null muxer.
1439
1440 This muxer does not generate any output file, it is mainly useful for
1441 testing or benchmarking purposes.
1442
1443 For example to benchmark decoding with @command{ffmpeg} you can use the
1444 command:
1445 @example
1446 ffmpeg -benchmark -i INPUT -f null out.null
1447 @end example
1448
1449 Note that the above command does not read or write the @file{out.null}
1450 file, but specifying the output file is required by the @command{ffmpeg}
1451 syntax.
1452
1453 Alternatively you can write the command as:
1454 @example
1455 ffmpeg -benchmark -i INPUT -f null -
1456 @end example
1457
1458 @section nut
1459
1460 @table @option
1461 @item -syncpoints @var{flags}
1462 Change the syncpoint usage in nut:
1463 @table @option
1464 @item @var{default} use the normal low-overhead seeking aids.
1465 @item @var{none} do not use the syncpoints at all, reducing the overhead but making the stream non-seekable;
1466     Use of this option is not recommended, as the resulting files are very damage
1467     sensitive and seeking is not possible. Also in general the overhead from
1468     syncpoints is negligible. Note, -@code{write_index} 0 can be used to disable
1469     all growing data tables, allowing to mux endless streams with limited memory
1470     and without these disadvantages.
1471 @item @var{timestamped} extend the syncpoint with a wallclock field.
1472 @end table
1473 The @var{none} and @var{timestamped} flags are experimental.
1474 @item -write_index @var{bool}
1475 Write index at the end, the default is to write an index.
1476 @end table
1477
1478 @example
1479 ffmpeg -i INPUT -f_strict experimental -syncpoints none - | processor
1480 @end example
1481
1482 @section ogg
1483
1484 Ogg container muxer.
1485
1486 @table @option
1487 @item -page_duration @var{duration}
1488 Preferred page duration, in microseconds. The muxer will attempt to create
1489 pages that are approximately @var{duration} microseconds long. This allows the
1490 user to compromise between seek granularity and container overhead. The default
1491 is 1 second. A value of 0 will fill all segments, making pages as large as
1492 possible. A value of 1 will effectively use 1 packet-per-page in most
1493 situations, giving a small seek granularity at the cost of additional container
1494 overhead.
1495 @item -serial_offset @var{value}
1496 Serial value from which to set the streams serial number.
1497 Setting it to different and sufficiently large values ensures that the produced
1498 ogg files can be safely chained.
1499
1500 @end table
1501
1502 @anchor{segment}
1503 @section segment, stream_segment, ssegment
1504
1505 Basic stream segmenter.
1506
1507 This muxer outputs streams to a number of separate files of nearly
1508 fixed duration. Output filename pattern can be set in a fashion
1509 similar to @ref{image2}, or by using a @code{strftime} template if
1510 the @option{strftime} option is enabled.
1511
1512 @code{stream_segment} is a variant of the muxer used to write to
1513 streaming output formats, i.e. which do not require global headers,
1514 and is recommended for outputting e.g. to MPEG transport stream segments.
1515 @code{ssegment} is a shorter alias for @code{stream_segment}.
1516
1517 Every segment starts with a keyframe of the selected reference stream,
1518 which is set through the @option{reference_stream} option.
1519
1520 Note that if you want accurate splitting for a video file, you need to
1521 make the input key frames correspond to the exact splitting times
1522 expected by the segmenter, or the segment muxer will start the new
1523 segment with the key frame found next after the specified start
1524 time.
1525
1526 The segment muxer works best with a single constant frame rate video.
1527
1528 Optionally it can generate a list of the created segments, by setting
1529 the option @var{segment_list}. The list type is specified by the
1530 @var{segment_list_type} option. The entry filenames in the segment
1531 list are set by default to the basename of the corresponding segment
1532 files.
1533
1534 See also the @ref{hls} muxer, which provides a more specific
1535 implementation for HLS segmentation.
1536
1537 @subsection Options
1538
1539 The segment muxer supports the following options:
1540
1541 @table @option
1542 @item increment_tc @var{1|0}
1543 if set to @code{1}, increment timecode between each segment
1544 If this is selected, the input need to have
1545 a timecode in the first video stream. Default value is
1546 @code{0}.
1547
1548 @item reference_stream @var{specifier}
1549 Set the reference stream, as specified by the string @var{specifier}.
1550 If @var{specifier} is set to @code{auto}, the reference is chosen
1551 automatically. Otherwise it must be a stream specifier (see the ``Stream
1552 specifiers'' chapter in the ffmpeg manual) which specifies the
1553 reference stream. The default value is @code{auto}.
1554
1555 @item segment_format @var{format}
1556 Override the inner container format, by default it is guessed by the filename
1557 extension.
1558
1559 @item segment_format_options @var{options_list}
1560 Set output format options using a :-separated list of key=value
1561 parameters. Values containing the @code{:} special character must be
1562 escaped.
1563
1564 @item segment_list @var{name}
1565 Generate also a listfile named @var{name}. If not specified no
1566 listfile is generated.
1567
1568 @item segment_list_flags @var{flags}
1569 Set flags affecting the segment list generation.
1570
1571 It currently supports the following flags:
1572 @table @samp
1573 @item cache
1574 Allow caching (only affects M3U8 list files).
1575
1576 @item live
1577 Allow live-friendly file generation.
1578 @end table
1579
1580 @item segment_list_size @var{size}
1581 Update the list file so that it contains at most @var{size}
1582 segments. If 0 the list file will contain all the segments. Default
1583 value is 0.
1584
1585 @item segment_list_entry_prefix @var{prefix}
1586 Prepend @var{prefix} to each entry. Useful to generate absolute paths.
1587 By default no prefix is applied.
1588
1589 @item segment_list_type @var{type}
1590 Select the listing format.
1591
1592 The following values are recognized:
1593 @table @samp
1594 @item flat
1595 Generate a flat list for the created segments, one segment per line.
1596
1597 @item csv, ext
1598 Generate a list for the created segments, one segment per line,
1599 each line matching the format (comma-separated values):
1600 @example
1601 @var{segment_filename},@var{segment_start_time},@var{segment_end_time}
1602 @end example
1603
1604 @var{segment_filename} is the name of the output file generated by the
1605 muxer according to the provided pattern. CSV escaping (according to
1606 RFC4180) is applied if required.
1607
1608 @var{segment_start_time} and @var{segment_end_time} specify
1609 the segment start and end time expressed in seconds.
1610
1611 A list file with the suffix @code{".csv"} or @code{".ext"} will
1612 auto-select this format.
1613
1614 @samp{ext} is deprecated in favor or @samp{csv}.
1615
1616 @item ffconcat
1617 Generate an ffconcat file for the created segments. The resulting file
1618 can be read using the FFmpeg @ref{concat} demuxer.
1619
1620 A list file with the suffix @code{".ffcat"} or @code{".ffconcat"} will
1621 auto-select this format.
1622
1623 @item m3u8
1624 Generate an extended M3U8 file, version 3, compliant with
1625 @url{http://tools.ietf.org/id/draft-pantos-http-live-streaming}.
1626
1627 A list file with the suffix @code{".m3u8"} will auto-select this format.
1628 @end table
1629
1630 If not specified the type is guessed from the list file name suffix.
1631
1632 @item segment_time @var{time}
1633 Set segment duration to @var{time}, the value must be a duration
1634 specification. Default value is "2". See also the
1635 @option{segment_times} option.
1636
1637 Note that splitting may not be accurate, unless you force the
1638 reference stream key-frames at the given time. See the introductory
1639 notice and the examples below.
1640
1641 @item segment_atclocktime @var{1|0}
1642 If set to "1" split at regular clock time intervals starting from 00:00
1643 o'clock. The @var{time} value specified in @option{segment_time} is
1644 used for setting the length of the splitting interval.
1645
1646 For example with @option{segment_time} set to "900" this makes it possible
1647 to create files at 12:00 o'clock, 12:15, 12:30, etc.
1648
1649 Default value is "0".
1650
1651 @item segment_clocktime_offset @var{duration}
1652 Delay the segment splitting times with the specified duration when using
1653 @option{segment_atclocktime}.
1654
1655 For example with @option{segment_time} set to "900" and
1656 @option{segment_clocktime_offset} set to "300" this makes it possible to
1657 create files at 12:05, 12:20, 12:35, etc.
1658
1659 Default value is "0".
1660
1661 @item segment_clocktime_wrap_duration @var{duration}
1662 Force the segmenter to only start a new segment if a packet reaches the muxer
1663 within the specified duration after the segmenting clock time. This way you
1664 can make the segmenter more resilient to backward local time jumps, such as
1665 leap seconds or transition to standard time from daylight savings time.
1666
1667 Default is the maximum possible duration which means starting a new segment
1668 regardless of the elapsed time since the last clock time.
1669
1670 @item segment_time_delta @var{delta}
1671 Specify the accuracy time when selecting the start time for a
1672 segment, expressed as a duration specification. Default value is "0".
1673
1674 When delta is specified a key-frame will start a new segment if its
1675 PTS satisfies the relation:
1676 @example
1677 PTS >= start_time - time_delta
1678 @end example
1679
1680 This option is useful when splitting video content, which is always
1681 split at GOP boundaries, in case a key frame is found just before the
1682 specified split time.
1683
1684 In particular may be used in combination with the @file{ffmpeg} option
1685 @var{force_key_frames}. The key frame times specified by
1686 @var{force_key_frames} may not be set accurately because of rounding
1687 issues, with the consequence that a key frame time may result set just
1688 before the specified time. For constant frame rate videos a value of
1689 1/(2*@var{frame_rate}) should address the worst case mismatch between
1690 the specified time and the time set by @var{force_key_frames}.
1691
1692 @item segment_times @var{times}
1693 Specify a list of split points. @var{times} contains a list of comma
1694 separated duration specifications, in increasing order. See also
1695 the @option{segment_time} option.
1696
1697 @item segment_frames @var{frames}
1698 Specify a list of split video frame numbers. @var{frames} contains a
1699 list of comma separated integer numbers, in increasing order.
1700
1701 This option specifies to start a new segment whenever a reference
1702 stream key frame is found and the sequential number (starting from 0)
1703 of the frame is greater or equal to the next value in the list.
1704
1705 @item segment_wrap @var{limit}
1706 Wrap around segment index once it reaches @var{limit}.
1707
1708 @item segment_start_number @var{number}
1709 Set the sequence number of the first segment. Defaults to @code{0}.
1710
1711 @item strftime @var{1|0}
1712 Use the @code{strftime} function to define the name of the new
1713 segments to write. If this is selected, the output segment name must
1714 contain a @code{strftime} function template. Default value is
1715 @code{0}.
1716
1717 @item break_non_keyframes @var{1|0}
1718 If enabled, allow segments to start on frames other than keyframes. This
1719 improves behavior on some players when the time between keyframes is
1720 inconsistent, but may make things worse on others, and can cause some oddities
1721 during seeking. Defaults to @code{0}.
1722
1723 @item reset_timestamps @var{1|0}
1724 Reset timestamps at the beginning of each segment, so that each segment
1725 will start with near-zero timestamps. It is meant to ease the playback
1726 of the generated segments. May not work with some combinations of
1727 muxers/codecs. It is set to @code{0} by default.
1728
1729 @item initial_offset @var{offset}
1730 Specify timestamp offset to apply to the output packet timestamps. The
1731 argument must be a time duration specification, and defaults to 0.
1732
1733 @item write_empty_segments @var{1|0}
1734 If enabled, write an empty segment if there are no packets during the period a
1735 segment would usually span. Otherwise, the segment will be filled with the next
1736 packet written. Defaults to @code{0}.
1737 @end table
1738
1739 Make sure to require a closed GOP when encoding and to set the GOP
1740 size to fit your segment time constraint.
1741
1742 @subsection Examples
1743
1744 @itemize
1745 @item
1746 Remux the content of file @file{in.mkv} to a list of segments
1747 @file{out-000.nut}, @file{out-001.nut}, etc., and write the list of
1748 generated segments to @file{out.list}:
1749 @example
1750 ffmpeg -i in.mkv -codec hevc -flags +cgop -g 60 -map 0 -f segment -segment_list out.list out%03d.nut
1751 @end example
1752
1753 @item
1754 Segment input and set output format options for the output segments:
1755 @example
1756 ffmpeg -i in.mkv -f segment -segment_time 10 -segment_format_options movflags=+faststart out%03d.mp4
1757 @end example
1758
1759 @item
1760 Segment the input file according to the split points specified by the
1761 @var{segment_times} option:
1762 @example
1763 ffmpeg -i in.mkv -codec copy -map 0 -f segment -segment_list out.csv -segment_times 1,2,3,5,8,13,21 out%03d.nut
1764 @end example
1765
1766 @item
1767 Use the @command{ffmpeg} @option{force_key_frames}
1768 option to force key frames in the input at the specified location, together
1769 with the segment option @option{segment_time_delta} to account for
1770 possible roundings operated when setting key frame times.
1771 @example
1772 ffmpeg -i in.mkv -force_key_frames 1,2,3,5,8,13,21 -codec:v mpeg4 -codec:a pcm_s16le -map 0 \
1773 -f segment -segment_list out.csv -segment_times 1,2,3,5,8,13,21 -segment_time_delta 0.05 out%03d.nut
1774 @end example
1775 In order to force key frames on the input file, transcoding is
1776 required.
1777
1778 @item
1779 Segment the input file by splitting the input file according to the
1780 frame numbers sequence specified with the @option{segment_frames} option:
1781 @example
1782 ffmpeg -i in.mkv -codec copy -map 0 -f segment -segment_list out.csv -segment_frames 100,200,300,500,800 out%03d.nut
1783 @end example
1784
1785 @item
1786 Convert the @file{in.mkv} to TS segments using the @code{libx264}
1787 and @code{aac} encoders:
1788 @example
1789 ffmpeg -i in.mkv -map 0 -codec:v libx264 -codec:a aac -f ssegment -segment_list out.list out%03d.ts
1790 @end example
1791
1792 @item
1793 Segment the input file, and create an M3U8 live playlist (can be used
1794 as live HLS source):
1795 @example
1796 ffmpeg -re -i in.mkv -codec copy -map 0 -f segment -segment_list playlist.m3u8 \
1797 -segment_list_flags +live -segment_time 10 out%03d.mkv
1798 @end example
1799 @end itemize
1800
1801 @section smoothstreaming
1802
1803 Smooth Streaming muxer generates a set of files (Manifest, chunks) suitable for serving with conventional web server.
1804
1805 @table @option
1806 @item window_size
1807 Specify the number of fragments kept in the manifest. Default 0 (keep all).
1808
1809 @item extra_window_size
1810 Specify the number of fragments kept outside of the manifest before removing from disk. Default 5.
1811
1812 @item lookahead_count
1813 Specify the number of lookahead fragments. Default 2.
1814
1815 @item min_frag_duration
1816 Specify the minimum fragment duration (in microseconds). Default 5000000.
1817
1818 @item remove_at_exit
1819 Specify whether to remove all fragments when finished. Default 0 (do not remove).
1820
1821 @end table
1822
1823 @anchor{fifo}
1824 @section fifo
1825
1826 The fifo pseudo-muxer allows the separation of encoding and muxing by using
1827 first-in-first-out queue and running the actual muxer in a separate thread. This
1828 is especially useful in combination with the @ref{tee} muxer and can be used to
1829 send data to several destinations with different reliability/writing speed/latency.
1830
1831 API users should be aware that callback functions (interrupt_callback,
1832 io_open and io_close) used within its AVFormatContext must be thread-safe.
1833
1834 The behavior of the fifo muxer if the queue fills up or if the output fails is
1835 selectable,
1836
1837 @itemize @bullet
1838
1839 @item
1840 output can be transparently restarted with configurable delay between retries
1841 based on real time or time of the processed stream.
1842
1843 @item
1844 encoding can be blocked during temporary failure, or continue transparently
1845 dropping packets in case fifo queue fills up.
1846
1847 @end itemize
1848
1849 @table @option
1850
1851 @item fifo_format
1852 Specify the format name. Useful if it cannot be guessed from the
1853 output name suffix.
1854
1855 @item queue_size
1856 Specify size of the queue (number of packets). Default value is 60.
1857
1858 @item format_opts
1859 Specify format options for the underlying muxer. Muxer options can be specified
1860 as a list of @var{key}=@var{value} pairs separated by ':'.
1861
1862 @item drop_pkts_on_overflow @var{bool}
1863 If set to 1 (true), in case the fifo queue fills up, packets will be dropped
1864 rather than blocking the encoder. This makes it possible to continue streaming without
1865 delaying the input, at the cost of omitting part of the stream. By default
1866 this option is set to 0 (false), so in such cases the encoder will be blocked
1867 until the muxer processes some of the packets and none of them is lost.
1868
1869 @item attempt_recovery @var{bool}
1870 If failure occurs, attempt to recover the output. This is especially useful
1871 when used with network output, since it makes it possible to restart streaming transparently.
1872 By default this option is set to 0 (false).
1873
1874 @item max_recovery_attempts
1875 Sets maximum number of successive unsuccessful recovery attempts after which
1876 the output fails permanently. By default this option is set to 0 (unlimited).
1877
1878 @item recovery_wait_time @var{duration}
1879 Waiting time before the next recovery attempt after previous unsuccessful
1880 recovery attempt. Default value is 5 seconds.
1881
1882 @item recovery_wait_streamtime @var{bool}
1883 If set to 0 (false), the real time is used when waiting for the recovery
1884 attempt (i.e. the recovery will be attempted after at least
1885 recovery_wait_time seconds).
1886 If set to 1 (true), the time of the processed stream is taken into account
1887 instead (i.e. the recovery will be attempted after at least @var{recovery_wait_time}
1888 seconds of the stream is omitted).
1889 By default, this option is set to 0 (false).
1890
1891 @item recover_any_error @var{bool}
1892 If set to 1 (true), recovery will be attempted regardless of type of the error
1893 causing the failure. By default this option is set to 0 (false) and in case of
1894 certain (usually permanent) errors the recovery is not attempted even when
1895 @var{attempt_recovery} is set to 1.
1896
1897 @item restart_with_keyframe @var{bool}
1898 Specify whether to wait for the keyframe after recovering from
1899 queue overflow or failure. This option is set to 0 (false) by default.
1900
1901 @end table
1902
1903 @subsection Examples
1904
1905 @itemize
1906
1907 @item
1908 Stream something to rtmp server, continue processing the stream at real-time
1909 rate even in case of temporary failure (network outage) and attempt to recover
1910 streaming every second indefinitely.
1911 @example
1912 ffmpeg -re -i ... -c:v libx264 -c:a aac -f fifo -fifo_format flv -map 0:v -map 0:a
1913   -drop_pkts_on_overflow 1 -attempt_recovery 1 -recovery_wait_time 1 rtmp://example.com/live/stream_name
1914 @end example
1915
1916 @end itemize
1917
1918 @anchor{tee}
1919 @section tee
1920
1921 The tee muxer can be used to write the same data to several files or any
1922 other kind of muxer. It can be used, for example, to both stream a video to
1923 the network and save it to disk at the same time.
1924
1925 It is different from specifying several outputs to the @command{ffmpeg}
1926 command-line tool because the audio and video data will be encoded only once
1927 with the tee muxer; encoding can be a very expensive process. It is not
1928 useful when using the libavformat API directly because it is then possible
1929 to feed the same packets to several muxers directly.
1930
1931 @table @option
1932
1933 @item use_fifo @var{bool}
1934 If set to 1, slave outputs will be processed in separate thread using @ref{fifo}
1935 muxer. This allows to compensate for different speed/latency/reliability of
1936 outputs and setup transparent recovery. By default this feature is turned off.
1937
1938 @item fifo_options
1939 Options to pass to fifo pseudo-muxer instances. See @ref{fifo}.
1940
1941 @end table
1942
1943 The slave outputs are specified in the file name given to the muxer,
1944 separated by '|'. If any of the slave name contains the '|' separator,
1945 leading or trailing spaces or any special character, it must be
1946 escaped (see @ref{quoting_and_escaping,,the "Quoting and escaping"
1947 section in the ffmpeg-utils(1) manual,ffmpeg-utils}).
1948
1949 Muxer options can be specified for each slave by prepending them as a list of
1950 @var{key}=@var{value} pairs separated by ':', between square brackets. If
1951 the options values contain a special character or the ':' separator, they
1952 must be escaped; note that this is a second level escaping.
1953
1954 The following special options are also recognized:
1955 @table @option
1956 @item f
1957 Specify the format name. Useful if it cannot be guessed from the
1958 output name suffix.
1959
1960 @item bsfs[/@var{spec}]
1961 Specify a list of bitstream filters to apply to the specified
1962 output.
1963
1964 @item use_fifo @var{bool}
1965 This allows to override tee muxer use_fifo option for individual slave muxer.
1966
1967 @item fifo_options
1968 This allows to override tee muxer fifo_options for individual slave muxer.
1969 See @ref{fifo}.
1970
1971 It is possible to specify to which streams a given bitstream filter
1972 applies, by appending a stream specifier to the option separated by
1973 @code{/}. @var{spec} must be a stream specifier (see @ref{Format
1974 stream specifiers}).  If the stream specifier is not specified, the
1975 bitstream filters will be applied to all streams in the output.
1976
1977 Several bitstream filters can be specified, separated by ",".
1978
1979 @item select
1980 Select the streams that should be mapped to the slave output,
1981 specified by a stream specifier. If not specified, this defaults to
1982 all the input streams. You may use multiple stream specifiers
1983 separated by commas (@code{,}) e.g.: @code{a:0,v}
1984
1985 @item onfail
1986 Specify behaviour on output failure. This can be set to either @code{abort} (which is
1987 default) or @code{ignore}. @code{abort} will cause whole process to fail in case of failure
1988 on this slave output. @code{ignore} will ignore failure on this output, so other outputs
1989 will continue without being affected.
1990 @end table
1991
1992 @subsection Examples
1993
1994 @itemize
1995 @item
1996 Encode something and both archive it in a WebM file and stream it
1997 as MPEG-TS over UDP (the streams need to be explicitly mapped):
1998 @example
1999 ffmpeg -i ... -c:v libx264 -c:a mp2 -f tee -map 0:v -map 0:a
2000   "archive-20121107.mkv|[f=mpegts]udp://10.0.1.255:1234/"
2001 @end example
2002
2003 @item
2004 As above, but continue streaming even if output to local file fails
2005 (for example local drive fills up):
2006 @example
2007 ffmpeg -i ... -c:v libx264 -c:a mp2 -f tee -map 0:v -map 0:a
2008   "[onfail=ignore]archive-20121107.mkv|[f=mpegts]udp://10.0.1.255:1234/"
2009 @end example
2010
2011 @item
2012 Use @command{ffmpeg} to encode the input, and send the output
2013 to three different destinations. The @code{dump_extra} bitstream
2014 filter is used to add extradata information to all the output video
2015 keyframes packets, as requested by the MPEG-TS format. The select
2016 option is applied to @file{out.aac} in order to make it contain only
2017 audio packets.
2018 @example
2019 ffmpeg -i ... -map 0 -flags +global_header -c:v libx264 -c:a aac
2020        -f tee "[bsfs/v=dump_extra]out.ts|[movflags=+faststart]out.mp4|[select=a]out.aac"
2021 @end example
2022
2023 @item
2024 As below, but select only stream @code{a:1} for the audio output. Note
2025 that a second level escaping must be performed, as ":" is a special
2026 character used to separate options.
2027 @example
2028 ffmpeg -i ... -map 0 -flags +global_header -c:v libx264 -c:a aac
2029        -f tee "[bsfs/v=dump_extra]out.ts|[movflags=+faststart]out.mp4|[select=\'a:1\']out.aac"
2030 @end example
2031 @end itemize
2032
2033 Note: some codecs may need different options depending on the output format;
2034 the auto-detection of this can not work with the tee muxer. The main example
2035 is the @option{global_header} flag.
2036
2037 @section webm_dash_manifest
2038
2039 WebM DASH Manifest muxer.
2040
2041 This muxer implements the WebM DASH Manifest specification to generate the DASH
2042 manifest XML. It also supports manifest generation for DASH live streams.
2043
2044 For more information see:
2045
2046 @itemize @bullet
2047 @item
2048 WebM DASH Specification: @url{https://sites.google.com/a/webmproject.org/wiki/adaptive-streaming/webm-dash-specification}
2049 @item
2050 ISO DASH Specification: @url{http://standards.iso.org/ittf/PubliclyAvailableStandards/c065274_ISO_IEC_23009-1_2014.zip}
2051 @end itemize
2052
2053 @subsection Options
2054
2055 This muxer supports the following options:
2056
2057 @table @option
2058 @item adaptation_sets
2059 This option has the following syntax: "id=x,streams=a,b,c id=y,streams=d,e" where x and y are the
2060 unique identifiers of the adaptation sets and a,b,c,d and e are the indices of the corresponding
2061 audio and video streams. Any number of adaptation sets can be added using this option.
2062
2063 @item live
2064 Set this to 1 to create a live stream DASH Manifest. Default: 0.
2065
2066 @item chunk_start_index
2067 Start index of the first chunk. This will go in the @samp{startNumber} attribute
2068 of the @samp{SegmentTemplate} element in the manifest. Default: 0.
2069
2070 @item chunk_duration_ms
2071 Duration of each chunk in milliseconds. This will go in the @samp{duration}
2072 attribute of the @samp{SegmentTemplate} element in the manifest. Default: 1000.
2073
2074 @item utc_timing_url
2075 URL of the page that will return the UTC timestamp in ISO format. This will go
2076 in the @samp{value} attribute of the @samp{UTCTiming} element in the manifest.
2077 Default: None.
2078
2079 @item time_shift_buffer_depth
2080 Smallest time (in seconds) shifting buffer for which any Representation is
2081 guaranteed to be available. This will go in the @samp{timeShiftBufferDepth}
2082 attribute of the @samp{MPD} element. Default: 60.
2083
2084 @item minimum_update_period
2085 Minimum update period (in seconds) of the manifest. This will go in the
2086 @samp{minimumUpdatePeriod} attribute of the @samp{MPD} element. Default: 0.
2087
2088 @end table
2089
2090 @subsection Example
2091 @example
2092 ffmpeg -f webm_dash_manifest -i video1.webm \
2093        -f webm_dash_manifest -i video2.webm \
2094        -f webm_dash_manifest -i audio1.webm \
2095        -f webm_dash_manifest -i audio2.webm \
2096        -map 0 -map 1 -map 2 -map 3 \
2097        -c copy \
2098        -f webm_dash_manifest \
2099        -adaptation_sets "id=0,streams=0,1 id=1,streams=2,3" \
2100        manifest.xml
2101 @end example
2102
2103 @section webm_chunk
2104
2105 WebM Live Chunk Muxer.
2106
2107 This muxer writes out WebM headers and chunks as separate files which can be
2108 consumed by clients that support WebM Live streams via DASH.
2109
2110 @subsection Options
2111
2112 This muxer supports the following options:
2113
2114 @table @option
2115 @item chunk_start_index
2116 Index of the first chunk (defaults to 0).
2117
2118 @item header
2119 Filename of the header where the initialization data will be written.
2120
2121 @item audio_chunk_duration
2122 Duration of each audio chunk in milliseconds (defaults to 5000).
2123 @end table
2124
2125 @subsection Example
2126 @example
2127 ffmpeg -f v4l2 -i /dev/video0 \
2128        -f alsa -i hw:0 \
2129        -map 0:0 \
2130        -c:v libvpx-vp9 \
2131        -s 640x360 -keyint_min 30 -g 30 \
2132        -f webm_chunk \
2133        -header webm_live_video_360.hdr \
2134        -chunk_start_index 1 \
2135        webm_live_video_360_%d.chk \
2136        -map 1:0 \
2137        -c:a libvorbis \
2138        -b:a 128k \
2139        -f webm_chunk \
2140        -header webm_live_audio_128.hdr \
2141        -chunk_start_index 1 \
2142        -audio_chunk_duration 1000 \
2143        webm_live_audio_128_%d.chk
2144 @end example
2145
2146 @c man end MUXERS