remove libmpcodecs
[ffmpeg.git] / doc / filters.texi
1 @chapter Filtering Introduction
2 @c man begin FILTERING INTRODUCTION
3
4 Filtering in FFmpeg is enabled through the libavfilter library.
5
6 In libavfilter, a filter can have multiple inputs and multiple
7 outputs.
8 To illustrate the sorts of things that are possible, we consider the
9 following filtergraph.
10
11 @example
12                 [main]
13 input --> split ---------------------> overlay --> output
14             |                             ^
15             |[tmp]                  [flip]|
16             +-----> crop --> vflip -------+
17 @end example
18
19 This filtergraph splits the input stream in two streams, then sends one
20 stream through the crop filter and the vflip filter, before merging it
21 back with the other stream by overlaying it on top. You can use the
22 following command to achieve this:
23
24 @example
25 ffmpeg -i INPUT -vf "split [main][tmp]; [tmp] crop=iw:ih/2:0:0, vflip [flip]; [main][flip] overlay=0:H/2" OUTPUT
26 @end example
27
28 The result will be that the top half of the video is mirrored
29 onto the bottom half of the output video.
30
31 Filters in the same linear chain are separated by commas, and distinct
32 linear chains of filters are separated by semicolons. In our example,
33 @var{crop,vflip} are in one linear chain, @var{split} and
34 @var{overlay} are separately in another. The points where the linear
35 chains join are labelled by names enclosed in square brackets. In the
36 example, the split filter generates two outputs that are associated to
37 the labels @var{[main]} and @var{[tmp]}.
38
39 The stream sent to the second output of @var{split}, labelled as
40 @var{[tmp]}, is processed through the @var{crop} filter, which crops
41 away the lower half part of the video, and then vertically flipped. The
42 @var{overlay} filter takes in input the first unchanged output of the
43 split filter (which was labelled as @var{[main]}), and overlay on its
44 lower half the output generated by the @var{crop,vflip} filterchain.
45
46 Some filters take in input a list of parameters: they are specified
47 after the filter name and an equal sign, and are separated from each other
48 by a colon.
49
50 There exist so-called @var{source filters} that do not have an
51 audio/video input, and @var{sink filters} that will not have audio/video
52 output.
53
54 @c man end FILTERING INTRODUCTION
55
56 @chapter graph2dot
57 @c man begin GRAPH2DOT
58
59 The @file{graph2dot} program included in the FFmpeg @file{tools}
60 directory can be used to parse a filtergraph description and issue a
61 corresponding textual representation in the dot language.
62
63 Invoke the command:
64 @example
65 graph2dot -h
66 @end example
67
68 to see how to use @file{graph2dot}.
69
70 You can then pass the dot description to the @file{dot} program (from
71 the graphviz suite of programs) and obtain a graphical representation
72 of the filtergraph.
73
74 For example the sequence of commands:
75 @example
76 echo @var{GRAPH_DESCRIPTION} | \
77 tools/graph2dot -o graph.tmp && \
78 dot -Tpng graph.tmp -o graph.png && \
79 display graph.png
80 @end example
81
82 can be used to create and display an image representing the graph
83 described by the @var{GRAPH_DESCRIPTION} string. Note that this string must be
84 a complete self-contained graph, with its inputs and outputs explicitly defined.
85 For example if your command line is of the form:
86 @example
87 ffmpeg -i infile -vf scale=640:360 outfile
88 @end example
89 your @var{GRAPH_DESCRIPTION} string will need to be of the form:
90 @example
91 nullsrc,scale=640:360,nullsink
92 @end example
93 you may also need to set the @var{nullsrc} parameters and add a @var{format}
94 filter in order to simulate a specific input file.
95
96 @c man end GRAPH2DOT
97
98 @chapter Filtergraph description
99 @c man begin FILTERGRAPH DESCRIPTION
100
101 A filtergraph is a directed graph of connected filters. It can contain
102 cycles, and there can be multiple links between a pair of
103 filters. Each link has one input pad on one side connecting it to one
104 filter from which it takes its input, and one output pad on the other
105 side connecting it to one filter accepting its output.
106
107 Each filter in a filtergraph is an instance of a filter class
108 registered in the application, which defines the features and the
109 number of input and output pads of the filter.
110
111 A filter with no input pads is called a "source", and a filter with no
112 output pads is called a "sink".
113
114 @anchor{Filtergraph syntax}
115 @section Filtergraph syntax
116
117 A filtergraph has a textual representation, which is recognized by the
118 @option{-filter}/@option{-vf}/@option{-af} and
119 @option{-filter_complex} options in @command{ffmpeg} and
120 @option{-vf}/@option{-af} in @command{ffplay}, and by the
121 @code{avfilter_graph_parse_ptr()} function defined in
122 @file{libavfilter/avfilter.h}.
123
124 A filterchain consists of a sequence of connected filters, each one
125 connected to the previous one in the sequence. A filterchain is
126 represented by a list of ","-separated filter descriptions.
127
128 A filtergraph consists of a sequence of filterchains. A sequence of
129 filterchains is represented by a list of ";"-separated filterchain
130 descriptions.
131
132 A filter is represented by a string of the form:
133 [@var{in_link_1}]...[@var{in_link_N}]@var{filter_name}=@var{arguments}[@var{out_link_1}]...[@var{out_link_M}]
134
135 @var{filter_name} is the name of the filter class of which the
136 described filter is an instance of, and has to be the name of one of
137 the filter classes registered in the program.
138 The name of the filter class is optionally followed by a string
139 "=@var{arguments}".
140
141 @var{arguments} is a string which contains the parameters used to
142 initialize the filter instance. It may have one of two forms:
143 @itemize
144
145 @item
146 A ':'-separated list of @var{key=value} pairs.
147
148 @item
149 A ':'-separated list of @var{value}. In this case, the keys are assumed to be
150 the option names in the order they are declared. E.g. the @code{fade} filter
151 declares three options in this order -- @option{type}, @option{start_frame} and
152 @option{nb_frames}. Then the parameter list @var{in:0:30} means that the value
153 @var{in} is assigned to the option @option{type}, @var{0} to
154 @option{start_frame} and @var{30} to @option{nb_frames}.
155
156 @item
157 A ':'-separated list of mixed direct @var{value} and long @var{key=value}
158 pairs. The direct @var{value} must precede the @var{key=value} pairs, and
159 follow the same constraints order of the previous point. The following
160 @var{key=value} pairs can be set in any preferred order.
161
162 @end itemize
163
164 If the option value itself is a list of items (e.g. the @code{format} filter
165 takes a list of pixel formats), the items in the list are usually separated by
166 '|'.
167
168 The list of arguments can be quoted using the character "'" as initial
169 and ending mark, and the character '\' for escaping the characters
170 within the quoted text; otherwise the argument string is considered
171 terminated when the next special character (belonging to the set
172 "[]=;,") is encountered.
173
174 The name and arguments of the filter are optionally preceded and
175 followed by a list of link labels.
176 A link label allows one to name a link and associate it to a filter output
177 or input pad. The preceding labels @var{in_link_1}
178 ... @var{in_link_N}, are associated to the filter input pads,
179 the following labels @var{out_link_1} ... @var{out_link_M}, are
180 associated to the output pads.
181
182 When two link labels with the same name are found in the
183 filtergraph, a link between the corresponding input and output pad is
184 created.
185
186 If an output pad is not labelled, it is linked by default to the first
187 unlabelled input pad of the next filter in the filterchain.
188 For example in the filterchain
189 @example
190 nullsrc, split[L1], [L2]overlay, nullsink
191 @end example
192 the split filter instance has two output pads, and the overlay filter
193 instance two input pads. The first output pad of split is labelled
194 "L1", the first input pad of overlay is labelled "L2", and the second
195 output pad of split is linked to the second input pad of overlay,
196 which are both unlabelled.
197
198 In a filter description, if the input label of the first filter is not
199 specified, "in" is assumed; if the output label of the last filter is not
200 specified, "out" is assumed.
201
202 In a complete filterchain all the unlabelled filter input and output
203 pads must be connected. A filtergraph is considered valid if all the
204 filter input and output pads of all the filterchains are connected.
205
206 Libavfilter will automatically insert @ref{scale} filters where format
207 conversion is required. It is possible to specify swscale flags
208 for those automatically inserted scalers by prepending
209 @code{sws_flags=@var{flags};}
210 to the filtergraph description.
211
212 Here is a BNF description of the filtergraph syntax:
213 @example
214 @var{NAME}             ::= sequence of alphanumeric characters and '_'
215 @var{LINKLABEL}        ::= "[" @var{NAME} "]"
216 @var{LINKLABELS}       ::= @var{LINKLABEL} [@var{LINKLABELS}]
217 @var{FILTER_ARGUMENTS} ::= sequence of chars (possibly quoted)
218 @var{FILTER}           ::= [@var{LINKLABELS}] @var{NAME} ["=" @var{FILTER_ARGUMENTS}] [@var{LINKLABELS}]
219 @var{FILTERCHAIN}      ::= @var{FILTER} [,@var{FILTERCHAIN}]
220 @var{FILTERGRAPH}      ::= [sws_flags=@var{flags};] @var{FILTERCHAIN} [;@var{FILTERGRAPH}]
221 @end example
222
223 @section Notes on filtergraph escaping
224
225 Filtergraph description composition entails several levels of
226 escaping. See @ref{quoting_and_escaping,,the "Quoting and escaping"
227 section in the ffmpeg-utils(1) manual,ffmpeg-utils} for more
228 information about the employed escaping procedure.
229
230 A first level escaping affects the content of each filter option
231 value, which may contain the special character @code{:} used to
232 separate values, or one of the escaping characters @code{\'}.
233
234 A second level escaping affects the whole filter description, which
235 may contain the escaping characters @code{\'} or the special
236 characters @code{[],;} used by the filtergraph description.
237
238 Finally, when you specify a filtergraph on a shell commandline, you
239 need to perform a third level escaping for the shell special
240 characters contained within it.
241
242 For example, consider the following string to be embedded in
243 the @ref{drawtext} filter description @option{text} value:
244 @example
245 this is a 'string': may contain one, or more, special characters
246 @end example
247
248 This string contains the @code{'} special escaping character, and the
249 @code{:} special character, so it needs to be escaped in this way:
250 @example
251 text=this is a \'string\'\: may contain one, or more, special characters
252 @end example
253
254 A second level of escaping is required when embedding the filter
255 description in a filtergraph description, in order to escape all the
256 filtergraph special characters. Thus the example above becomes:
257 @example
258 drawtext=text=this is a \\\'string\\\'\\: may contain one\, or more\, special characters
259 @end example
260 (note that in addition to the @code{\'} escaping special characters,
261 also @code{,} needs to be escaped).
262
263 Finally an additional level of escaping is needed when writing the
264 filtergraph description in a shell command, which depends on the
265 escaping rules of the adopted shell. For example, assuming that
266 @code{\} is special and needs to be escaped with another @code{\}, the
267 previous string will finally result in:
268 @example
269 -vf "drawtext=text=this is a \\\\\\'string\\\\\\'\\\\: may contain one\\, or more\\, special characters"
270 @end example
271
272 @chapter Timeline editing
273
274 Some filters support a generic @option{enable} option. For the filters
275 supporting timeline editing, this option can be set to an expression which is
276 evaluated before sending a frame to the filter. If the evaluation is non-zero,
277 the filter will be enabled, otherwise the frame will be sent unchanged to the
278 next filter in the filtergraph.
279
280 The expression accepts the following values:
281 @table @samp
282 @item t
283 timestamp expressed in seconds, NAN if the input timestamp is unknown
284
285 @item n
286 sequential number of the input frame, starting from 0
287
288 @item pos
289 the position in the file of the input frame, NAN if unknown
290
291 @item w
292 @item h
293 width and height of the input frame if video
294 @end table
295
296 Additionally, these filters support an @option{enable} command that can be used
297 to re-define the expression.
298
299 Like any other filtering option, the @option{enable} option follows the same
300 rules.
301
302 For example, to enable a blur filter (@ref{smartblur}) from 10 seconds to 3
303 minutes, and a @ref{curves} filter starting at 3 seconds:
304 @example
305 smartblur = enable='between(t,10,3*60)',
306 curves    = enable='gte(t,3)' : preset=cross_process
307 @end example
308
309 @c man end FILTERGRAPH DESCRIPTION
310
311 @chapter Audio Filters
312 @c man begin AUDIO FILTERS
313
314 When you configure your FFmpeg build, you can disable any of the
315 existing filters using @code{--disable-filters}.
316 The configure output will show the audio filters included in your
317 build.
318
319 Below is a description of the currently available audio filters.
320
321 @section adelay
322
323 Delay one or more audio channels.
324
325 Samples in delayed channel are filled with silence.
326
327 The filter accepts the following option:
328
329 @table @option
330 @item delays
331 Set list of delays in milliseconds for each channel separated by '|'.
332 At least one delay greater than 0 should be provided.
333 Unused delays will be silently ignored. If number of given delays is
334 smaller than number of channels all remaining channels will not be delayed.
335 @end table
336
337 @subsection Examples
338
339 @itemize
340 @item
341 Delay first channel by 1.5 seconds, the third channel by 0.5 seconds and leave
342 the second channel (and any other channels that may be present) unchanged.
343 @example
344 adelay=1500|0|500
345 @end example
346 @end itemize
347
348 @section aecho
349
350 Apply echoing to the input audio.
351
352 Echoes are reflected sound and can occur naturally amongst mountains
353 (and sometimes large buildings) when talking or shouting; digital echo
354 effects emulate this behaviour and are often used to help fill out the
355 sound of a single instrument or vocal. The time difference between the
356 original signal and the reflection is the @code{delay}, and the
357 loudness of the reflected signal is the @code{decay}.
358 Multiple echoes can have different delays and decays.
359
360 A description of the accepted parameters follows.
361
362 @table @option
363 @item in_gain
364 Set input gain of reflected signal. Default is @code{0.6}.
365
366 @item out_gain
367 Set output gain of reflected signal. Default is @code{0.3}.
368
369 @item delays
370 Set list of time intervals in milliseconds between original signal and reflections
371 separated by '|'. Allowed range for each @code{delay} is @code{(0 - 90000.0]}.
372 Default is @code{1000}.
373
374 @item decays
375 Set list of loudnesses of reflected signals separated by '|'.
376 Allowed range for each @code{decay} is @code{(0 - 1.0]}.
377 Default is @code{0.5}.
378 @end table
379
380 @subsection Examples
381
382 @itemize
383 @item
384 Make it sound as if there are twice as many instruments as are actually playing:
385 @example
386 aecho=0.8:0.88:60:0.4
387 @end example
388
389 @item
390 If delay is very short, then it sound like a (metallic) robot playing music:
391 @example
392 aecho=0.8:0.88:6:0.4
393 @end example
394
395 @item
396 A longer delay will sound like an open air concert in the mountains:
397 @example
398 aecho=0.8:0.9:1000:0.3
399 @end example
400
401 @item
402 Same as above but with one more mountain:
403 @example
404 aecho=0.8:0.9:1000|1800:0.3|0.25
405 @end example
406 @end itemize
407
408 @section aeval
409
410 Modify an audio signal according to the specified expressions.
411
412 This filter accepts one or more expressions (one for each channel),
413 which are evaluated and used to modify a corresponding audio signal.
414
415 It accepts the following parameters:
416
417 @table @option
418 @item exprs
419 Set the '|'-separated expressions list for each separate channel. If
420 the number of input channels is greater than the number of
421 expressions, the last specified expression is used for the remaining
422 output channels.
423
424 @item channel_layout, c
425 Set output channel layout. If not specified, the channel layout is
426 specified by the number of expressions. If set to @samp{same}, it will
427 use by default the same input channel layout.
428 @end table
429
430 Each expression in @var{exprs} can contain the following constants and functions:
431
432 @table @option
433 @item ch
434 channel number of the current expression
435
436 @item n
437 number of the evaluated sample, starting from 0
438
439 @item s
440 sample rate
441
442 @item t
443 time of the evaluated sample expressed in seconds
444
445 @item nb_in_channels
446 @item nb_out_channels
447 input and output number of channels
448
449 @item val(CH)
450 the value of input channel with number @var{CH}
451 @end table
452
453 Note: this filter is slow. For faster processing you should use a
454 dedicated filter.
455
456 @subsection Examples
457
458 @itemize
459 @item
460 Half volume:
461 @example
462 aeval=val(ch)/2:c=same
463 @end example
464
465 @item
466 Invert phase of the second channel:
467 @example
468 aeval=val(0)|-val(1)
469 @end example
470 @end itemize
471
472 @section afade
473
474 Apply fade-in/out effect to input audio.
475
476 A description of the accepted parameters follows.
477
478 @table @option
479 @item type, t
480 Specify the effect type, can be either @code{in} for fade-in, or
481 @code{out} for a fade-out effect. Default is @code{in}.
482
483 @item start_sample, ss
484 Specify the number of the start sample for starting to apply the fade
485 effect. Default is 0.
486
487 @item nb_samples, ns
488 Specify the number of samples for which the fade effect has to last. At
489 the end of the fade-in effect the output audio will have the same
490 volume as the input audio, at the end of the fade-out transition
491 the output audio will be silence. Default is 44100.
492
493 @item start_time, st
494 Specify the start time of the fade effect. Default is 0.
495 The value must be specified as a time duration; see
496 @ref{time duration syntax,,the Time duration section in the ffmpeg-utils(1) manual,ffmpeg-utils}
497 for the accepted syntax.
498 If set this option is used instead of @var{start_sample}.
499
500 @item duration, d
501 Specify the duration of the fade effect. See
502 @ref{time duration syntax,,the Time duration section in the ffmpeg-utils(1) manual,ffmpeg-utils}
503 for the accepted syntax.
504 At the end of the fade-in effect the output audio will have the same
505 volume as the input audio, at the end of the fade-out transition
506 the output audio will be silence.
507 By default the duration is determined by @var{nb_samples}.
508 If set this option is used instead of @var{nb_samples}.
509
510 @item curve
511 Set curve for fade transition.
512
513 It accepts the following values:
514 @table @option
515 @item tri
516 select triangular, linear slope (default)
517 @item qsin
518 select quarter of sine wave
519 @item hsin
520 select half of sine wave
521 @item esin
522 select exponential sine wave
523 @item log
524 select logarithmic
525 @item par
526 select inverted parabola
527 @item qua
528 select quadratic
529 @item cub
530 select cubic
531 @item squ
532 select square root
533 @item cbr
534 select cubic root
535 @end table
536 @end table
537
538 @subsection Examples
539
540 @itemize
541 @item
542 Fade in first 15 seconds of audio:
543 @example
544 afade=t=in:ss=0:d=15
545 @end example
546
547 @item
548 Fade out last 25 seconds of a 900 seconds audio:
549 @example
550 afade=t=out:st=875:d=25
551 @end example
552 @end itemize
553
554 @anchor{aformat}
555 @section aformat
556
557 Set output format constraints for the input audio. The framework will
558 negotiate the most appropriate format to minimize conversions.
559
560 It accepts the following parameters:
561 @table @option
562
563 @item sample_fmts
564 A '|'-separated list of requested sample formats.
565
566 @item sample_rates
567 A '|'-separated list of requested sample rates.
568
569 @item channel_layouts
570 A '|'-separated list of requested channel layouts.
571
572 See @ref{channel layout syntax,,the Channel Layout section in the ffmpeg-utils(1) manual,ffmpeg-utils}
573 for the required syntax.
574 @end table
575
576 If a parameter is omitted, all values are allowed.
577
578 Force the output to either unsigned 8-bit or signed 16-bit stereo
579 @example
580 aformat=sample_fmts=u8|s16:channel_layouts=stereo
581 @end example
582
583 @section allpass
584
585 Apply a two-pole all-pass filter with central frequency (in Hz)
586 @var{frequency}, and filter-width @var{width}.
587 An all-pass filter changes the audio's frequency to phase relationship
588 without changing its frequency to amplitude relationship.
589
590 The filter accepts the following options:
591
592 @table @option
593 @item frequency, f
594 Set frequency in Hz.
595
596 @item width_type
597 Set method to specify band-width of filter.
598 @table @option
599 @item h
600 Hz
601 @item q
602 Q-Factor
603 @item o
604 octave
605 @item s
606 slope
607 @end table
608
609 @item width, w
610 Specify the band-width of a filter in width_type units.
611 @end table
612
613 @section amerge
614
615 Merge two or more audio streams into a single multi-channel stream.
616
617 The filter accepts the following options:
618
619 @table @option
620
621 @item inputs
622 Set the number of inputs. Default is 2.
623
624 @end table
625
626 If the channel layouts of the inputs are disjoint, and therefore compatible,
627 the channel layout of the output will be set accordingly and the channels
628 will be reordered as necessary. If the channel layouts of the inputs are not
629 disjoint, the output will have all the channels of the first input then all
630 the channels of the second input, in that order, and the channel layout of
631 the output will be the default value corresponding to the total number of
632 channels.
633
634 For example, if the first input is in 2.1 (FL+FR+LF) and the second input
635 is FC+BL+BR, then the output will be in 5.1, with the channels in the
636 following order: a1, a2, b1, a3, b2, b3 (a1 is the first channel of the
637 first input, b1 is the first channel of the second input).
638
639 On the other hand, if both input are in stereo, the output channels will be
640 in the default order: a1, a2, b1, b2, and the channel layout will be
641 arbitrarily set to 4.0, which may or may not be the expected value.
642
643 All inputs must have the same sample rate, and format.
644
645 If inputs do not have the same duration, the output will stop with the
646 shortest.
647
648 @subsection Examples
649
650 @itemize
651 @item
652 Merge two mono files into a stereo stream:
653 @example
654 amovie=left.wav [l] ; amovie=right.mp3 [r] ; [l] [r] amerge
655 @end example
656
657 @item
658 Multiple merges assuming 1 video stream and 6 audio streams in @file{input.mkv}:
659 @example
660 ffmpeg -i input.mkv -filter_complex "[0:1][0:2][0:3][0:4][0:5][0:6] amerge=inputs=6" -c:a pcm_s16le output.mkv
661 @end example
662 @end itemize
663
664 @section amix
665
666 Mixes multiple audio inputs into a single output.
667
668 Note that this filter only supports float samples (the @var{amerge}
669 and @var{pan} audio filters support many formats). If the @var{amix}
670 input has integer samples then @ref{aresample} will be automatically
671 inserted to perform the conversion to float samples.
672
673 For example
674 @example
675 ffmpeg -i INPUT1 -i INPUT2 -i INPUT3 -filter_complex amix=inputs=3:duration=first:dropout_transition=3 OUTPUT
676 @end example
677 will mix 3 input audio streams to a single output with the same duration as the
678 first input and a dropout transition time of 3 seconds.
679
680 It accepts the following parameters:
681 @table @option
682
683 @item inputs
684 The number of inputs. If unspecified, it defaults to 2.
685
686 @item duration
687 How to determine the end-of-stream.
688 @table @option
689
690 @item longest
691 The duration of the longest input. (default)
692
693 @item shortest
694 The duration of the shortest input.
695
696 @item first
697 The duration of the first input.
698
699 @end table
700
701 @item dropout_transition
702 The transition time, in seconds, for volume renormalization when an input
703 stream ends. The default value is 2 seconds.
704
705 @end table
706
707 @section anull
708
709 Pass the audio source unchanged to the output.
710
711 @section apad
712
713 Pad the end of an audio stream with silence.
714
715 This can be used together with @command{ffmpeg} @option{-shortest} to
716 extend audio streams to the same length as the video stream.
717
718 A description of the accepted options follows.
719
720 @table @option
721 @item packet_size
722 Set silence packet size. Default value is 4096.
723
724 @item pad_len
725 Set the number of samples of silence to add to the end. After the
726 value is reached, the stream is terminated. This option is mutually
727 exclusive with @option{whole_len}.
728
729 @item whole_len
730 Set the minimum total number of samples in the output audio stream. If
731 the value is longer than the input audio length, silence is added to
732 the end, until the value is reached. This option is mutually exclusive
733 with @option{pad_len}.
734 @end table
735
736 If neither the @option{pad_len} nor the @option{whole_len} option is
737 set, the filter will add silence to the end of the input stream
738 indefinitely.
739
740 @subsection Examples
741
742 @itemize
743 @item
744 Add 1024 samples of silence to the end of the input:
745 @example
746 apad=pad_len=1024
747 @end example
748
749 @item
750 Make sure the audio output will contain at least 10000 samples, pad
751 the input with silence if required:
752 @example
753 apad=whole_len=10000
754 @end example
755
756 @item
757 Use @command{ffmpeg} to pad the audio input with silence, so that the
758 video stream will always result the shortest and will be converted
759 until the end in the output file when using the @option{shortest}
760 option:
761 @example
762 ffmpeg -i VIDEO -i AUDIO -filter_complex "[1:0]apad" -shortest OUTPUT
763 @end example
764 @end itemize
765
766 @section aphaser
767 Add a phasing effect to the input audio.
768
769 A phaser filter creates series of peaks and troughs in the frequency spectrum.
770 The position of the peaks and troughs are modulated so that they vary over time, creating a sweeping effect.
771
772 A description of the accepted parameters follows.
773
774 @table @option
775 @item in_gain
776 Set input gain. Default is 0.4.
777
778 @item out_gain
779 Set output gain. Default is 0.74
780
781 @item delay
782 Set delay in milliseconds. Default is 3.0.
783
784 @item decay
785 Set decay. Default is 0.4.
786
787 @item speed
788 Set modulation speed in Hz. Default is 0.5.
789
790 @item type
791 Set modulation type. Default is triangular.
792
793 It accepts the following values:
794 @table @samp
795 @item triangular, t
796 @item sinusoidal, s
797 @end table
798 @end table
799
800 @anchor{aresample}
801 @section aresample
802
803 Resample the input audio to the specified parameters, using the
804 libswresample library. If none are specified then the filter will
805 automatically convert between its input and output.
806
807 This filter is also able to stretch/squeeze the audio data to make it match
808 the timestamps or to inject silence / cut out audio to make it match the
809 timestamps, do a combination of both or do neither.
810
811 The filter accepts the syntax
812 [@var{sample_rate}:]@var{resampler_options}, where @var{sample_rate}
813 expresses a sample rate and @var{resampler_options} is a list of
814 @var{key}=@var{value} pairs, separated by ":". See the
815 ffmpeg-resampler manual for the complete list of supported options.
816
817 @subsection Examples
818
819 @itemize
820 @item
821 Resample the input audio to 44100Hz:
822 @example
823 aresample=44100
824 @end example
825
826 @item
827 Stretch/squeeze samples to the given timestamps, with a maximum of 1000
828 samples per second compensation:
829 @example
830 aresample=async=1000
831 @end example
832 @end itemize
833
834 @section asetnsamples
835
836 Set the number of samples per each output audio frame.
837
838 The last output packet may contain a different number of samples, as
839 the filter will flush all the remaining samples when the input audio
840 signal its end.
841
842 The filter accepts the following options:
843
844 @table @option
845
846 @item nb_out_samples, n
847 Set the number of frames per each output audio frame. The number is
848 intended as the number of samples @emph{per each channel}.
849 Default value is 1024.
850
851 @item pad, p
852 If set to 1, the filter will pad the last audio frame with zeroes, so
853 that the last frame will contain the same number of samples as the
854 previous ones. Default value is 1.
855 @end table
856
857 For example, to set the number of per-frame samples to 1234 and
858 disable padding for the last frame, use:
859 @example
860 asetnsamples=n=1234:p=0
861 @end example
862
863 @section asetrate
864
865 Set the sample rate without altering the PCM data.
866 This will result in a change of speed and pitch.
867
868 The filter accepts the following options:
869
870 @table @option
871 @item sample_rate, r
872 Set the output sample rate. Default is 44100 Hz.
873 @end table
874
875 @section ashowinfo
876
877 Show a line containing various information for each input audio frame.
878 The input audio is not modified.
879
880 The shown line contains a sequence of key/value pairs of the form
881 @var{key}:@var{value}.
882
883 The following values are shown in the output:
884
885 @table @option
886 @item n
887 The (sequential) number of the input frame, starting from 0.
888
889 @item pts
890 The presentation timestamp of the input frame, in time base units; the time base
891 depends on the filter input pad, and is usually 1/@var{sample_rate}.
892
893 @item pts_time
894 The presentation timestamp of the input frame in seconds.
895
896 @item pos
897 position of the frame in the input stream, -1 if this information in
898 unavailable and/or meaningless (for example in case of synthetic audio)
899
900 @item fmt
901 The sample format.
902
903 @item chlayout
904 The channel layout.
905
906 @item rate
907 The sample rate for the audio frame.
908
909 @item nb_samples
910 The number of samples (per channel) in the frame.
911
912 @item checksum
913 The Adler-32 checksum (printed in hexadecimal) of the audio data. For planar
914 audio, the data is treated as if all the planes were concatenated.
915
916 @item plane_checksums
917 A list of Adler-32 checksums for each data plane.
918 @end table
919
920 @section astats
921
922 Display time domain statistical information about the audio channels.
923 Statistics are calculated and displayed for each audio channel and,
924 where applicable, an overall figure is also given.
925
926 It accepts the following option:
927 @table @option
928 @item length
929 Short window length in seconds, used for peak and trough RMS measurement.
930 Default is @code{0.05} (50 milliseconds). Allowed range is @code{[0.1 - 10]}.
931 @end table
932
933 A description of each shown parameter follows:
934
935 @table @option
936 @item DC offset
937 Mean amplitude displacement from zero.
938
939 @item Min level
940 Minimal sample level.
941
942 @item Max level
943 Maximal sample level.
944
945 @item Peak level dB
946 @item RMS level dB
947 Standard peak and RMS level measured in dBFS.
948
949 @item RMS peak dB
950 @item RMS trough dB
951 Peak and trough values for RMS level measured over a short window.
952
953 @item Crest factor
954 Standard ratio of peak to RMS level (note: not in dB).
955
956 @item Flat factor
957 Flatness (i.e. consecutive samples with the same value) of the signal at its peak levels
958 (i.e. either @var{Min level} or @var{Max level}).
959
960 @item Peak count
961 Number of occasions (not the number of samples) that the signal attained either
962 @var{Min level} or @var{Max level}.
963 @end table
964
965 @section astreamsync
966
967 Forward two audio streams and control the order the buffers are forwarded.
968
969 The filter accepts the following options:
970
971 @table @option
972 @item expr, e
973 Set the expression deciding which stream should be
974 forwarded next: if the result is negative, the first stream is forwarded; if
975 the result is positive or zero, the second stream is forwarded. It can use
976 the following variables:
977
978 @table @var
979 @item b1 b2
980 number of buffers forwarded so far on each stream
981 @item s1 s2
982 number of samples forwarded so far on each stream
983 @item t1 t2
984 current timestamp of each stream
985 @end table
986
987 The default value is @code{t1-t2}, which means to always forward the stream
988 that has a smaller timestamp.
989 @end table
990
991 @subsection Examples
992
993 Stress-test @code{amerge} by randomly sending buffers on the wrong
994 input, while avoiding too much of a desynchronization:
995 @example
996 amovie=file.ogg [a] ; amovie=file.mp3 [b] ;
997 [a] [b] astreamsync=(2*random(1))-1+tanh(5*(t1-t2)) [a2] [b2] ;
998 [a2] [b2] amerge
999 @end example
1000
1001 @section asyncts
1002
1003 Synchronize audio data with timestamps by squeezing/stretching it and/or
1004 dropping samples/adding silence when needed.
1005
1006 This filter is not built by default, please use @ref{aresample} to do squeezing/stretching.
1007
1008 It accepts the following parameters:
1009 @table @option
1010
1011 @item compensate
1012 Enable stretching/squeezing the data to make it match the timestamps. Disabled
1013 by default. When disabled, time gaps are covered with silence.
1014
1015 @item min_delta
1016 The minimum difference between timestamps and audio data (in seconds) to trigger
1017 adding/dropping samples. The default value is 0.1. If you get an imperfect
1018 sync with this filter, try setting this parameter to 0.
1019
1020 @item max_comp
1021 The maximum compensation in samples per second. Only relevant with compensate=1.
1022 The default value is 500.
1023
1024 @item first_pts
1025 Assume that the first PTS should be this value. The time base is 1 / sample
1026 rate. This allows for padding/trimming at the start of the stream. By default,
1027 no assumption is made about the first frame's expected PTS, so no padding or
1028 trimming is done. For example, this could be set to 0 to pad the beginning with
1029 silence if an audio stream starts after the video stream or to trim any samples
1030 with a negative PTS due to encoder delay.
1031
1032 @end table
1033
1034 @section atempo
1035
1036 Adjust audio tempo.
1037
1038 The filter accepts exactly one parameter, the audio tempo. If not
1039 specified then the filter will assume nominal 1.0 tempo. Tempo must
1040 be in the [0.5, 2.0] range.
1041
1042 @subsection Examples
1043
1044 @itemize
1045 @item
1046 Slow down audio to 80% tempo:
1047 @example
1048 atempo=0.8
1049 @end example
1050
1051 @item
1052 To speed up audio to 125% tempo:
1053 @example
1054 atempo=1.25
1055 @end example
1056 @end itemize
1057
1058 @section atrim
1059
1060 Trim the input so that the output contains one continuous subpart of the input.
1061
1062 It accepts the following parameters:
1063 @table @option
1064 @item start
1065 Timestamp (in seconds) of the start of the section to keep. I.e. the audio
1066 sample with the timestamp @var{start} will be the first sample in the output.
1067
1068 @item end
1069 Specify time of the first audio sample that will be dropped, i.e. the
1070 audio sample immediately preceding the one with the timestamp @var{end} will be
1071 the last sample in the output.
1072
1073 @item start_pts
1074 Same as @var{start}, except this option sets the start timestamp in samples
1075 instead of seconds.
1076
1077 @item end_pts
1078 Same as @var{end}, except this option sets the end timestamp in samples instead
1079 of seconds.
1080
1081 @item duration
1082 The maximum duration of the output in seconds.
1083
1084 @item start_sample
1085 The number of the first sample that should be output.
1086
1087 @item end_sample
1088 The number of the first sample that should be dropped.
1089 @end table
1090
1091 @option{start}, @option{end}, and @option{duration} are expressed as time
1092 duration specifications; see
1093 @ref{time duration syntax,,the Time duration section in the ffmpeg-utils(1) manual,ffmpeg-utils}.
1094
1095 Note that the first two sets of the start/end options and the @option{duration}
1096 option look at the frame timestamp, while the _sample options simply count the
1097 samples that pass through the filter. So start/end_pts and start/end_sample will
1098 give different results when the timestamps are wrong, inexact or do not start at
1099 zero. Also note that this filter does not modify the timestamps. If you wish
1100 to have the output timestamps start at zero, insert the asetpts filter after the
1101 atrim filter.
1102
1103 If multiple start or end options are set, this filter tries to be greedy and
1104 keep all samples that match at least one of the specified constraints. To keep
1105 only the part that matches all the constraints at once, chain multiple atrim
1106 filters.
1107
1108 The defaults are such that all the input is kept. So it is possible to set e.g.
1109 just the end values to keep everything before the specified time.
1110
1111 Examples:
1112 @itemize
1113 @item
1114 Drop everything except the second minute of input:
1115 @example
1116 ffmpeg -i INPUT -af atrim=60:120
1117 @end example
1118
1119 @item
1120 Keep only the first 1000 samples:
1121 @example
1122 ffmpeg -i INPUT -af atrim=end_sample=1000
1123 @end example
1124
1125 @end itemize
1126
1127 @section bandpass
1128
1129 Apply a two-pole Butterworth band-pass filter with central
1130 frequency @var{frequency}, and (3dB-point) band-width width.
1131 The @var{csg} option selects a constant skirt gain (peak gain = Q)
1132 instead of the default: constant 0dB peak gain.
1133 The filter roll off at 6dB per octave (20dB per decade).
1134
1135 The filter accepts the following options:
1136
1137 @table @option
1138 @item frequency, f
1139 Set the filter's central frequency. Default is @code{3000}.
1140
1141 @item csg
1142 Constant skirt gain if set to 1. Defaults to 0.
1143
1144 @item width_type
1145 Set method to specify band-width of filter.
1146 @table @option
1147 @item h
1148 Hz
1149 @item q
1150 Q-Factor
1151 @item o
1152 octave
1153 @item s
1154 slope
1155 @end table
1156
1157 @item width, w
1158 Specify the band-width of a filter in width_type units.
1159 @end table
1160
1161 @section bandreject
1162
1163 Apply a two-pole Butterworth band-reject filter with central
1164 frequency @var{frequency}, and (3dB-point) band-width @var{width}.
1165 The filter roll off at 6dB per octave (20dB per decade).
1166
1167 The filter accepts the following options:
1168
1169 @table @option
1170 @item frequency, f
1171 Set the filter's central frequency. Default is @code{3000}.
1172
1173 @item width_type
1174 Set method to specify band-width of filter.
1175 @table @option
1176 @item h
1177 Hz
1178 @item q
1179 Q-Factor
1180 @item o
1181 octave
1182 @item s
1183 slope
1184 @end table
1185
1186 @item width, w
1187 Specify the band-width of a filter in width_type units.
1188 @end table
1189
1190 @section bass
1191
1192 Boost or cut the bass (lower) frequencies of the audio using a two-pole
1193 shelving filter with a response similar to that of a standard
1194 hi-fi's tone-controls. This is also known as shelving equalisation (EQ).
1195
1196 The filter accepts the following options:
1197
1198 @table @option
1199 @item gain, g
1200 Give the gain at 0 Hz. Its useful range is about -20
1201 (for a large cut) to +20 (for a large boost).
1202 Beware of clipping when using a positive gain.
1203
1204 @item frequency, f
1205 Set the filter's central frequency and so can be used
1206 to extend or reduce the frequency range to be boosted or cut.
1207 The default value is @code{100} Hz.
1208
1209 @item width_type
1210 Set method to specify band-width of filter.
1211 @table @option
1212 @item h
1213 Hz
1214 @item q
1215 Q-Factor
1216 @item o
1217 octave
1218 @item s
1219 slope
1220 @end table
1221
1222 @item width, w
1223 Determine how steep is the filter's shelf transition.
1224 @end table
1225
1226 @section biquad
1227
1228 Apply a biquad IIR filter with the given coefficients.
1229 Where @var{b0}, @var{b1}, @var{b2} and @var{a0}, @var{a1}, @var{a2}
1230 are the numerator and denominator coefficients respectively.
1231
1232 @section bs2b
1233 Bauer stereo to binaural transformation, which improves headphone listening of
1234 stereo audio records.
1235
1236 It accepts the following parameters:
1237 @table @option
1238
1239 @item profile
1240 Pre-defined crossfeed level.
1241 @table @option
1242
1243 @item default
1244 Default level (fcut=700, feed=50).
1245
1246 @item cmoy
1247 Chu Moy circuit (fcut=700, feed=60).
1248
1249 @item jmeier
1250 Jan Meier circuit (fcut=650, feed=95).
1251
1252 @end table
1253
1254 @item fcut
1255 Cut frequency (in Hz).
1256
1257 @item feed
1258 Feed level (in Hz).
1259
1260 @end table
1261
1262 @section channelmap
1263
1264 Remap input channels to new locations.
1265
1266 It accepts the following parameters:
1267 @table @option
1268 @item channel_layout
1269 The channel layout of the output stream.
1270
1271 @item map
1272 Map channels from input to output. The argument is a '|'-separated list of
1273 mappings, each in the @code{@var{in_channel}-@var{out_channel}} or
1274 @var{in_channel} form. @var{in_channel} can be either the name of the input
1275 channel (e.g. FL for front left) or its index in the input channel layout.
1276 @var{out_channel} is the name of the output channel or its index in the output
1277 channel layout. If @var{out_channel} is not given then it is implicitly an
1278 index, starting with zero and increasing by one for each mapping.
1279 @end table
1280
1281 If no mapping is present, the filter will implicitly map input channels to
1282 output channels, preserving indices.
1283
1284 For example, assuming a 5.1+downmix input MOV file,
1285 @example
1286 ffmpeg -i in.mov -filter 'channelmap=map=DL-FL|DR-FR' out.wav
1287 @end example
1288 will create an output WAV file tagged as stereo from the downmix channels of
1289 the input.
1290
1291 To fix a 5.1 WAV improperly encoded in AAC's native channel order
1292 @example
1293 ffmpeg -i in.wav -filter 'channelmap=1|2|0|5|3|4:channel_layout=5.1' out.wav
1294 @end example
1295
1296 @section channelsplit
1297
1298 Split each channel from an input audio stream into a separate output stream.
1299
1300 It accepts the following parameters:
1301 @table @option
1302 @item channel_layout
1303 The channel layout of the input stream. The default is "stereo".
1304 @end table
1305
1306 For example, assuming a stereo input MP3 file,
1307 @example
1308 ffmpeg -i in.mp3 -filter_complex channelsplit out.mkv
1309 @end example
1310 will create an output Matroska file with two audio streams, one containing only
1311 the left channel and the other the right channel.
1312
1313 Split a 5.1 WAV file into per-channel files:
1314 @example
1315 ffmpeg -i in.wav -filter_complex
1316 'channelsplit=channel_layout=5.1[FL][FR][FC][LFE][SL][SR]'
1317 -map '[FL]' front_left.wav -map '[FR]' front_right.wav -map '[FC]'
1318 front_center.wav -map '[LFE]' lfe.wav -map '[SL]' side_left.wav -map '[SR]'
1319 side_right.wav
1320 @end example
1321
1322 @section compand
1323 Compress or expand the audio's dynamic range.
1324
1325 It accepts the following parameters:
1326
1327 @table @option
1328
1329 @item attacks
1330 @item decays
1331 A list of times in seconds for each channel over which the instantaneous level
1332 of the input signal is averaged to determine its volume. @var{attacks} refers to
1333 increase of volume and @var{decays} refers to decrease of volume. For most
1334 situations, the attack time (response to the audio getting louder) should be
1335 shorter than the decay time, because the human ear is more sensitive to sudden
1336 loud audio than sudden soft audio. A typical value for attack is 0.3 seconds and
1337 a typical value for decay is 0.8 seconds.
1338
1339 @item points
1340 A list of points for the transfer function, specified in dB relative to the
1341 maximum possible signal amplitude. Each key points list must be defined using
1342 the following syntax: @code{x0/y0|x1/y1|x2/y2|....} or
1343 @code{x0/y0 x1/y1 x2/y2 ....}
1344
1345 The input values must be in strictly increasing order but the transfer function
1346 does not have to be monotonically rising. The point @code{0/0} is assumed but
1347 may be overridden (by @code{0/out-dBn}). Typical values for the transfer
1348 function are @code{-70/-70|-60/-20}.
1349
1350 @item soft-knee
1351 Set the curve radius in dB for all joints. It defaults to 0.01.
1352
1353 @item gain
1354 Set the additional gain in dB to be applied at all points on the transfer
1355 function. This allows for easy adjustment of the overall gain.
1356 It defaults to 0.
1357
1358 @item volume
1359 Set an initial volume, in dB, to be assumed for each channel when filtering
1360 starts. This permits the user to supply a nominal level initially, so that, for
1361 example, a very large gain is not applied to initial signal levels before the
1362 companding has begun to operate. A typical value for audio which is initially
1363 quiet is -90 dB. It defaults to 0.
1364
1365 @item delay
1366 Set a delay, in seconds. The input audio is analyzed immediately, but audio is
1367 delayed before being fed to the volume adjuster. Specifying a delay
1368 approximately equal to the attack/decay times allows the filter to effectively
1369 operate in predictive rather than reactive mode. It defaults to 0.
1370
1371 @end table
1372
1373 @subsection Examples
1374
1375 @itemize
1376 @item
1377 Make music with both quiet and loud passages suitable for listening to in a
1378 noisy environment:
1379 @example
1380 compand=.3|.3:1|1:-90/-60|-60/-40|-40/-30|-20/-20:6:0:-90:0.2
1381 @end example
1382
1383 @item
1384 A noise gate for when the noise is at a lower level than the signal:
1385 @example
1386 compand=.1|.1:.2|.2:-900/-900|-50.1/-900|-50/-50:.01:0:-90:.1
1387 @end example
1388
1389 @item
1390 Here is another noise gate, this time for when the noise is at a higher level
1391 than the signal (making it, in some ways, similar to squelch):
1392 @example
1393 compand=.1|.1:.1|.1:-45.1/-45.1|-45/-900|0/-900:.01:45:-90:.1
1394 @end example
1395 @end itemize
1396
1397 @section earwax
1398
1399 Make audio easier to listen to on headphones.
1400
1401 This filter adds `cues' to 44.1kHz stereo (i.e. audio CD format) audio
1402 so that when listened to on headphones the stereo image is moved from
1403 inside your head (standard for headphones) to outside and in front of
1404 the listener (standard for speakers).
1405
1406 Ported from SoX.
1407
1408 @section equalizer
1409
1410 Apply a two-pole peaking equalisation (EQ) filter. With this
1411 filter, the signal-level at and around a selected frequency can
1412 be increased or decreased, whilst (unlike bandpass and bandreject
1413 filters) that at all other frequencies is unchanged.
1414
1415 In order to produce complex equalisation curves, this filter can
1416 be given several times, each with a different central frequency.
1417
1418 The filter accepts the following options:
1419
1420 @table @option
1421 @item frequency, f
1422 Set the filter's central frequency in Hz.
1423
1424 @item width_type
1425 Set method to specify band-width of filter.
1426 @table @option
1427 @item h
1428 Hz
1429 @item q
1430 Q-Factor
1431 @item o
1432 octave
1433 @item s
1434 slope
1435 @end table
1436
1437 @item width, w
1438 Specify the band-width of a filter in width_type units.
1439
1440 @item gain, g
1441 Set the required gain or attenuation in dB.
1442 Beware of clipping when using a positive gain.
1443 @end table
1444
1445 @subsection Examples
1446 @itemize
1447 @item
1448 Attenuate 10 dB at 1000 Hz, with a bandwidth of 200 Hz:
1449 @example
1450 equalizer=f=1000:width_type=h:width=200:g=-10
1451 @end example
1452
1453 @item
1454 Apply 2 dB gain at 1000 Hz with Q 1 and attenuate 5 dB at 100 Hz with Q 2:
1455 @example
1456 equalizer=f=1000:width_type=q:width=1:g=2,equalizer=f=100:width_type=q:width=2:g=-5
1457 @end example
1458 @end itemize
1459
1460 @section flanger
1461 Apply a flanging effect to the audio.
1462
1463 The filter accepts the following options:
1464
1465 @table @option
1466 @item delay
1467 Set base delay in milliseconds. Range from 0 to 30. Default value is 0.
1468
1469 @item depth
1470 Set added swep delay in milliseconds. Range from 0 to 10. Default value is 2.
1471
1472 @item regen
1473 Set percentage regeneration (delayed signal feedback). Range from -95 to 95.
1474 Default value is 0.
1475
1476 @item width
1477 Set percentage of delayed signal mixed with original. Range from 0 to 100.
1478 Default value is 71.
1479
1480 @item speed
1481 Set sweeps per second (Hz). Range from 0.1 to 10. Default value is 0.5.
1482
1483 @item shape
1484 Set swept wave shape, can be @var{triangular} or @var{sinusoidal}.
1485 Default value is @var{sinusoidal}.
1486
1487 @item phase
1488 Set swept wave percentage-shift for multi channel. Range from 0 to 100.
1489 Default value is 25.
1490
1491 @item interp
1492 Set delay-line interpolation, @var{linear} or @var{quadratic}.
1493 Default is @var{linear}.
1494 @end table
1495
1496 @section highpass
1497
1498 Apply a high-pass filter with 3dB point frequency.
1499 The filter can be either single-pole, or double-pole (the default).
1500 The filter roll off at 6dB per pole per octave (20dB per pole per decade).
1501
1502 The filter accepts the following options:
1503
1504 @table @option
1505 @item frequency, f
1506 Set frequency in Hz. Default is 3000.
1507
1508 @item poles, p
1509 Set number of poles. Default is 2.
1510
1511 @item width_type
1512 Set method to specify band-width of filter.
1513 @table @option
1514 @item h
1515 Hz
1516 @item q
1517 Q-Factor
1518 @item o
1519 octave
1520 @item s
1521 slope
1522 @end table
1523
1524 @item width, w
1525 Specify the band-width of a filter in width_type units.
1526 Applies only to double-pole filter.
1527 The default is 0.707q and gives a Butterworth response.
1528 @end table
1529
1530 @section join
1531
1532 Join multiple input streams into one multi-channel stream.
1533
1534 It accepts the following parameters:
1535 @table @option
1536
1537 @item inputs
1538 The number of input streams. It defaults to 2.
1539
1540 @item channel_layout
1541 The desired output channel layout. It defaults to stereo.
1542
1543 @item map
1544 Map channels from inputs to output. The argument is a '|'-separated list of
1545 mappings, each in the @code{@var{input_idx}.@var{in_channel}-@var{out_channel}}
1546 form. @var{input_idx} is the 0-based index of the input stream. @var{in_channel}
1547 can be either the name of the input channel (e.g. FL for front left) or its
1548 index in the specified input stream. @var{out_channel} is the name of the output
1549 channel.
1550 @end table
1551
1552 The filter will attempt to guess the mappings when they are not specified
1553 explicitly. It does so by first trying to find an unused matching input channel
1554 and if that fails it picks the first unused input channel.
1555
1556 Join 3 inputs (with properly set channel layouts):
1557 @example
1558 ffmpeg -i INPUT1 -i INPUT2 -i INPUT3 -filter_complex join=inputs=3 OUTPUT
1559 @end example
1560
1561 Build a 5.1 output from 6 single-channel streams:
1562 @example
1563 ffmpeg -i fl -i fr -i fc -i sl -i sr -i lfe -filter_complex
1564 'join=inputs=6:channel_layout=5.1:map=0.0-FL|1.0-FR|2.0-FC|3.0-SL|4.0-SR|5.0-LFE'
1565 out
1566 @end example
1567
1568 @section ladspa
1569
1570 Load a LADSPA (Linux Audio Developer's Simple Plugin API) plugin.
1571
1572 To enable compilation of this filter you need to configure FFmpeg with
1573 @code{--enable-ladspa}.
1574
1575 @table @option
1576 @item file, f
1577 Specifies the name of LADSPA plugin library to load. If the environment
1578 variable @env{LADSPA_PATH} is defined, the LADSPA plugin is searched in
1579 each one of the directories specified by the colon separated list in
1580 @env{LADSPA_PATH}, otherwise in the standard LADSPA paths, which are in
1581 this order: @file{HOME/.ladspa/lib/}, @file{/usr/local/lib/ladspa/},
1582 @file{/usr/lib/ladspa/}.
1583
1584 @item plugin, p
1585 Specifies the plugin within the library. Some libraries contain only
1586 one plugin, but others contain many of them. If this is not set filter
1587 will list all available plugins within the specified library.
1588
1589 @item controls, c
1590 Set the '|' separated list of controls which are zero or more floating point
1591 values that determine the behavior of the loaded plugin (for example delay,
1592 threshold or gain).
1593 Controls need to be defined using the following syntax:
1594 c0=@var{value0}|c1=@var{value1}|c2=@var{value2}|..., where
1595 @var{valuei} is the value set on the @var{i}-th control.
1596 If @option{controls} is set to @code{help}, all available controls and
1597 their valid ranges are printed.
1598
1599 @item sample_rate, s
1600 Specify the sample rate, default to 44100. Only used if plugin have
1601 zero inputs.
1602
1603 @item nb_samples, n
1604 Set the number of samples per channel per each output frame, default
1605 is 1024. Only used if plugin have zero inputs.
1606
1607 @item duration, d
1608 Set the minimum duration of the sourced audio. See
1609 @ref{time duration syntax,,the Time duration section in the ffmpeg-utils(1) manual,ffmpeg-utils}
1610 for the accepted syntax.
1611 Note that the resulting duration may be greater than the specified duration,
1612 as the generated audio is always cut at the end of a complete frame.
1613 If not specified, or the expressed duration is negative, the audio is
1614 supposed to be generated forever.
1615 Only used if plugin have zero inputs.
1616
1617 @end table
1618
1619 @subsection Examples
1620
1621 @itemize
1622 @item
1623 List all available plugins within amp (LADSPA example plugin) library:
1624 @example
1625 ladspa=file=amp
1626 @end example
1627
1628 @item
1629 List all available controls and their valid ranges for @code{vcf_notch}
1630 plugin from @code{VCF} library:
1631 @example
1632 ladspa=f=vcf:p=vcf_notch:c=help
1633 @end example
1634
1635 @item
1636 Simulate low quality audio equipment using @code{Computer Music Toolkit} (CMT)
1637 plugin library:
1638 @example
1639 ladspa=file=cmt:plugin=lofi:controls=c0=22|c1=12|c2=12
1640 @end example
1641
1642 @item
1643 Add reverberation to the audio using TAP-plugins
1644 (Tom's Audio Processing plugins):
1645 @example
1646 ladspa=file=tap_reverb:tap_reverb
1647 @end example
1648
1649 @item
1650 Generate white noise, with 0.2 amplitude:
1651 @example
1652 ladspa=file=cmt:noise_source_white:c=c0=.2
1653 @end example
1654
1655 @item
1656 Generate 20 bpm clicks using plugin @code{C* Click - Metronome} from the
1657 @code{C* Audio Plugin Suite} (CAPS) library:
1658 @example
1659 ladspa=file=caps:Click:c=c1=20'
1660 @end example
1661
1662 @item
1663 Apply @code{C* Eq10X2 - Stereo 10-band equaliser} effect:
1664 @example
1665 ladspa=caps:Eq10X2:c=c0=-48|c9=-24|c3=12|c4=2
1666 @end example
1667 @end itemize
1668
1669 @subsection Commands
1670
1671 This filter supports the following commands:
1672 @table @option
1673 @item cN
1674 Modify the @var{N}-th control value.
1675
1676 If the specified value is not valid, it is ignored and prior one is kept.
1677 @end table
1678
1679 @section lowpass
1680
1681 Apply a low-pass filter with 3dB point frequency.
1682 The filter can be either single-pole or double-pole (the default).
1683 The filter roll off at 6dB per pole per octave (20dB per pole per decade).
1684
1685 The filter accepts the following options:
1686
1687 @table @option
1688 @item frequency, f
1689 Set frequency in Hz. Default is 500.
1690
1691 @item poles, p
1692 Set number of poles. Default is 2.
1693
1694 @item width_type
1695 Set method to specify band-width of filter.
1696 @table @option
1697 @item h
1698 Hz
1699 @item q
1700 Q-Factor
1701 @item o
1702 octave
1703 @item s
1704 slope
1705 @end table
1706
1707 @item width, w
1708 Specify the band-width of a filter in width_type units.
1709 Applies only to double-pole filter.
1710 The default is 0.707q and gives a Butterworth response.
1711 @end table
1712
1713 @section pan
1714
1715 Mix channels with specific gain levels. The filter accepts the output
1716 channel layout followed by a set of channels definitions.
1717
1718 This filter is also designed to efficiently remap the channels of an audio
1719 stream.
1720
1721 The filter accepts parameters of the form:
1722 "@var{l}|@var{outdef}|@var{outdef}|..."
1723
1724 @table @option
1725 @item l
1726 output channel layout or number of channels
1727
1728 @item outdef
1729 output channel specification, of the form:
1730 "@var{out_name}=[@var{gain}*]@var{in_name}[+[@var{gain}*]@var{in_name}...]"
1731
1732 @item out_name
1733 output channel to define, either a channel name (FL, FR, etc.) or a channel
1734 number (c0, c1, etc.)
1735
1736 @item gain
1737 multiplicative coefficient for the channel, 1 leaving the volume unchanged
1738
1739 @item in_name
1740 input channel to use, see out_name for details; it is not possible to mix
1741 named and numbered input channels
1742 @end table
1743
1744 If the `=' in a channel specification is replaced by `<', then the gains for
1745 that specification will be renormalized so that the total is 1, thus
1746 avoiding clipping noise.
1747
1748 @subsection Mixing examples
1749
1750 For example, if you want to down-mix from stereo to mono, but with a bigger
1751 factor for the left channel:
1752 @example
1753 pan=1c|c0=0.9*c0+0.1*c1
1754 @end example
1755
1756 A customized down-mix to stereo that works automatically for 3-, 4-, 5- and
1757 7-channels surround:
1758 @example
1759 pan=stereo| FL < FL + 0.5*FC + 0.6*BL + 0.6*SL | FR < FR + 0.5*FC + 0.6*BR + 0.6*SR
1760 @end example
1761
1762 Note that @command{ffmpeg} integrates a default down-mix (and up-mix) system
1763 that should be preferred (see "-ac" option) unless you have very specific
1764 needs.
1765
1766 @subsection Remapping examples
1767
1768 The channel remapping will be effective if, and only if:
1769
1770 @itemize
1771 @item gain coefficients are zeroes or ones,
1772 @item only one input per channel output,
1773 @end itemize
1774
1775 If all these conditions are satisfied, the filter will notify the user ("Pure
1776 channel mapping detected"), and use an optimized and lossless method to do the
1777 remapping.
1778
1779 For example, if you have a 5.1 source and want a stereo audio stream by
1780 dropping the extra channels:
1781 @example
1782 pan="stereo| c0=FL | c1=FR"
1783 @end example
1784
1785 Given the same source, you can also switch front left and front right channels
1786 and keep the input channel layout:
1787 @example
1788 pan="5.1| c0=c1 | c1=c0 | c2=c2 | c3=c3 | c4=c4 | c5=c5"
1789 @end example
1790
1791 If the input is a stereo audio stream, you can mute the front left channel (and
1792 still keep the stereo channel layout) with:
1793 @example
1794 pan="stereo|c1=c1"
1795 @end example
1796
1797 Still with a stereo audio stream input, you can copy the right channel in both
1798 front left and right:
1799 @example
1800 pan="stereo| c0=FR | c1=FR"
1801 @end example
1802
1803 @section replaygain
1804
1805 ReplayGain scanner filter. This filter takes an audio stream as an input and
1806 outputs it unchanged.
1807 At end of filtering it displays @code{track_gain} and @code{track_peak}.
1808
1809 @section resample
1810
1811 Convert the audio sample format, sample rate and channel layout. It is
1812 not meant to be used directly.
1813
1814 @section silencedetect
1815
1816 Detect silence in an audio stream.
1817
1818 This filter logs a message when it detects that the input audio volume is less
1819 or equal to a noise tolerance value for a duration greater or equal to the
1820 minimum detected noise duration.
1821
1822 The printed times and duration are expressed in seconds.
1823
1824 The filter accepts the following options:
1825
1826 @table @option
1827 @item duration, d
1828 Set silence duration until notification (default is 2 seconds).
1829
1830 @item noise, n
1831 Set noise tolerance. Can be specified in dB (in case "dB" is appended to the
1832 specified value) or amplitude ratio. Default is -60dB, or 0.001.
1833 @end table
1834
1835 @subsection Examples
1836
1837 @itemize
1838 @item
1839 Detect 5 seconds of silence with -50dB noise tolerance:
1840 @example
1841 silencedetect=n=-50dB:d=5
1842 @end example
1843
1844 @item
1845 Complete example with @command{ffmpeg} to detect silence with 0.0001 noise
1846 tolerance in @file{silence.mp3}:
1847 @example
1848 ffmpeg -i silence.mp3 -af silencedetect=noise=0.0001 -f null -
1849 @end example
1850 @end itemize
1851
1852 @section silenceremove
1853
1854 Remove silence from the beginning, middle or end of the audio.
1855
1856 The filter accepts the following options:
1857
1858 @table @option
1859 @item start_periods
1860 This value is used to indicate if audio should be trimmed at beginning of
1861 the audio. A value of zero indicates no silence should be trimmed from the
1862 beginning. When specifying a non-zero value, it trims audio up until it
1863 finds non-silence. Normally, when trimming silence from beginning of audio
1864 the @var{start_periods} will be @code{1} but it can be increased to higher
1865 values to trim all audio up to specific count of non-silence periods.
1866 Default value is @code{0}.
1867
1868 @item start_duration
1869 Specify the amount of time that non-silence must be detected before it stops
1870 trimming audio. By increasing the duration, bursts of noises can be treated
1871 as silence and trimmed off. Default value is @code{0}.
1872
1873 @item start_threshold
1874 This indicates what sample value should be treated as silence. For digital
1875 audio, a value of @code{0} may be fine but for audio recorded from analog,
1876 you may wish to increase the value to account for background noise.
1877 Can be specified in dB (in case "dB" is appended to the specified value)
1878 or amplitude ratio. Default value is @code{0}.
1879
1880 @item stop_periods
1881 Set the count for trimming silence from the end of audio.
1882 To remove silence from the middle of a file, specify a @var{stop_periods}
1883 that is negative. This value is then treated as a positive value and is
1884 used to indicate the effect should restart processing as specified by
1885 @var{start_periods}, making it suitable for removing periods of silence
1886 in the middle of the audio.
1887 Default value is @code{0}.
1888
1889 @item stop_duration
1890 Specify a duration of silence that must exist before audio is not copied any
1891 more. By specifying a higher duration, silence that is wanted can be left in
1892 the audio.
1893 Default value is @code{0}.
1894
1895 @item stop_threshold
1896 This is the same as @option{start_threshold} but for trimming silence from
1897 the end of audio.
1898 Can be specified in dB (in case "dB" is appended to the specified value)
1899 or amplitude ratio. Default value is @code{0}.
1900
1901 @item leave_silence
1902 This indicate that @var{stop_duration} length of audio should be left intact
1903 at the beginning of each period of silence.
1904 For example, if you want to remove long pauses between words but do not want
1905 to remove the pauses completely. Default value is @code{0}.
1906
1907 @end table
1908
1909 @subsection Examples
1910
1911 @itemize
1912 @item
1913 The following example shows how this filter can be used to start a recording
1914 that does not contain the delay at the start which usually occurs between
1915 pressing the record button and the start of the performance:
1916 @example
1917 silenceremove=1:5:0.02
1918 @end example
1919 @end itemize
1920
1921 @section treble
1922
1923 Boost or cut treble (upper) frequencies of the audio using a two-pole
1924 shelving filter with a response similar to that of a standard
1925 hi-fi's tone-controls. This is also known as shelving equalisation (EQ).
1926
1927 The filter accepts the following options:
1928
1929 @table @option
1930 @item gain, g
1931 Give the gain at whichever is the lower of ~22 kHz and the
1932 Nyquist frequency. Its useful range is about -20 (for a large cut)
1933 to +20 (for a large boost). Beware of clipping when using a positive gain.
1934
1935 @item frequency, f
1936 Set the filter's central frequency and so can be used
1937 to extend or reduce the frequency range to be boosted or cut.
1938 The default value is @code{3000} Hz.
1939
1940 @item width_type
1941 Set method to specify band-width of filter.
1942 @table @option
1943 @item h
1944 Hz
1945 @item q
1946 Q-Factor
1947 @item o
1948 octave
1949 @item s
1950 slope
1951 @end table
1952
1953 @item width, w
1954 Determine how steep is the filter's shelf transition.
1955 @end table
1956
1957 @section volume
1958
1959 Adjust the input audio volume.
1960
1961 It accepts the following parameters:
1962 @table @option
1963
1964 @item volume
1965 Set audio volume expression.
1966
1967 Output values are clipped to the maximum value.
1968
1969 The output audio volume is given by the relation:
1970 @example
1971 @var{output_volume} = @var{volume} * @var{input_volume}
1972 @end example
1973
1974 The default value for @var{volume} is "1.0".
1975
1976 @item precision
1977 This parameter represents the mathematical precision.
1978
1979 It determines which input sample formats will be allowed, which affects the
1980 precision of the volume scaling.
1981
1982 @table @option
1983 @item fixed
1984 8-bit fixed-point; this limits input sample format to U8, S16, and S32.
1985 @item float
1986 32-bit floating-point; this limits input sample format to FLT. (default)
1987 @item double
1988 64-bit floating-point; this limits input sample format to DBL.
1989 @end table
1990
1991 @item replaygain
1992 Choose the behaviour on encountering ReplayGain side data in input frames.
1993
1994 @table @option
1995 @item drop
1996 Remove ReplayGain side data, ignoring its contents (the default).
1997
1998 @item ignore
1999 Ignore ReplayGain side data, but leave it in the frame.
2000
2001 @item track
2002 Prefer the track gain, if present.
2003
2004 @item album
2005 Prefer the album gain, if present.
2006 @end table
2007
2008 @item replaygain_preamp
2009 Pre-amplification gain in dB to apply to the selected replaygain gain.
2010
2011 Default value for @var{replaygain_preamp} is 0.0.
2012
2013 @item eval
2014 Set when the volume expression is evaluated.
2015
2016 It accepts the following values:
2017 @table @samp
2018 @item once
2019 only evaluate expression once during the filter initialization, or
2020 when the @samp{volume} command is sent
2021
2022 @item frame
2023 evaluate expression for each incoming frame
2024 @end table
2025
2026 Default value is @samp{once}.
2027 @end table
2028
2029 The volume expression can contain the following parameters.
2030
2031 @table @option
2032 @item n
2033 frame number (starting at zero)
2034 @item nb_channels
2035 number of channels
2036 @item nb_consumed_samples
2037 number of samples consumed by the filter
2038 @item nb_samples
2039 number of samples in the current frame
2040 @item pos
2041 original frame position in the file
2042 @item pts
2043 frame PTS
2044 @item sample_rate
2045 sample rate
2046 @item startpts
2047 PTS at start of stream
2048 @item startt
2049 time at start of stream
2050 @item t
2051 frame time
2052 @item tb
2053 timestamp timebase
2054 @item volume
2055 last set volume value
2056 @end table
2057
2058 Note that when @option{eval} is set to @samp{once} only the
2059 @var{sample_rate} and @var{tb} variables are available, all other
2060 variables will evaluate to NAN.
2061
2062 @subsection Commands
2063
2064 This filter supports the following commands:
2065 @table @option
2066 @item volume
2067 Modify the volume expression.
2068 The command accepts the same syntax of the corresponding option.
2069
2070 If the specified expression is not valid, it is kept at its current
2071 value.
2072 @item replaygain_noclip
2073 Prevent clipping by limiting the gain applied.
2074
2075 Default value for @var{replaygain_noclip} is 1.
2076
2077 @end table
2078
2079 @subsection Examples
2080
2081 @itemize
2082 @item
2083 Halve the input audio volume:
2084 @example
2085 volume=volume=0.5
2086 volume=volume=1/2
2087 volume=volume=-6.0206dB
2088 @end example
2089
2090 In all the above example the named key for @option{volume} can be
2091 omitted, for example like in:
2092 @example
2093 volume=0.5
2094 @end example
2095
2096 @item
2097 Increase input audio power by 6 decibels using fixed-point precision:
2098 @example
2099 volume=volume=6dB:precision=fixed
2100 @end example
2101
2102 @item
2103 Fade volume after time 10 with an annihilation period of 5 seconds:
2104 @example
2105 volume='if(lt(t,10),1,max(1-(t-10)/5,0))':eval=frame
2106 @end example
2107 @end itemize
2108
2109 @section volumedetect
2110
2111 Detect the volume of the input video.
2112
2113 The filter has no parameters. The input is not modified. Statistics about
2114 the volume will be printed in the log when the input stream end is reached.
2115
2116 In particular it will show the mean volume (root mean square), maximum
2117 volume (on a per-sample basis), and the beginning of a histogram of the
2118 registered volume values (from the maximum value to a cumulated 1/1000 of
2119 the samples).
2120
2121 All volumes are in decibels relative to the maximum PCM value.
2122
2123 @subsection Examples
2124
2125 Here is an excerpt of the output:
2126 @example
2127 [Parsed_volumedetect_0 @ 0xa23120] mean_volume: -27 dB
2128 [Parsed_volumedetect_0 @ 0xa23120] max_volume: -4 dB
2129 [Parsed_volumedetect_0 @ 0xa23120] histogram_4db: 6
2130 [Parsed_volumedetect_0 @ 0xa23120] histogram_5db: 62
2131 [Parsed_volumedetect_0 @ 0xa23120] histogram_6db: 286
2132 [Parsed_volumedetect_0 @ 0xa23120] histogram_7db: 1042
2133 [Parsed_volumedetect_0 @ 0xa23120] histogram_8db: 2551
2134 [Parsed_volumedetect_0 @ 0xa23120] histogram_9db: 4609
2135 [Parsed_volumedetect_0 @ 0xa23120] histogram_10db: 8409
2136 @end example
2137
2138 It means that:
2139 @itemize
2140 @item
2141 The mean square energy is approximately -27 dB, or 10^-2.7.
2142 @item
2143 The largest sample is at -4 dB, or more precisely between -4 dB and -5 dB.
2144 @item
2145 There are 6 samples at -4 dB, 62 at -5 dB, 286 at -6 dB, etc.
2146 @end itemize
2147
2148 In other words, raising the volume by +4 dB does not cause any clipping,
2149 raising it by +5 dB causes clipping for 6 samples, etc.
2150
2151 @c man end AUDIO FILTERS
2152
2153 @chapter Audio Sources
2154 @c man begin AUDIO SOURCES
2155
2156 Below is a description of the currently available audio sources.
2157
2158 @section abuffer
2159
2160 Buffer audio frames, and make them available to the filter chain.
2161
2162 This source is mainly intended for a programmatic use, in particular
2163 through the interface defined in @file{libavfilter/asrc_abuffer.h}.
2164
2165 It accepts the following parameters:
2166 @table @option
2167
2168 @item time_base
2169 The timebase which will be used for timestamps of submitted frames. It must be
2170 either a floating-point number or in @var{numerator}/@var{denominator} form.
2171
2172 @item sample_rate
2173 The sample rate of the incoming audio buffers.
2174
2175 @item sample_fmt
2176 The sample format of the incoming audio buffers.
2177 Either a sample format name or its corresponding integer representation from
2178 the enum AVSampleFormat in @file{libavutil/samplefmt.h}
2179
2180 @item channel_layout
2181 The channel layout of the incoming audio buffers.
2182 Either a channel layout name from channel_layout_map in
2183 @file{libavutil/channel_layout.c} or its corresponding integer representation
2184 from the AV_CH_LAYOUT_* macros in @file{libavutil/channel_layout.h}
2185
2186 @item channels
2187 The number of channels of the incoming audio buffers.
2188 If both @var{channels} and @var{channel_layout} are specified, then they
2189 must be consistent.
2190
2191 @end table
2192
2193 @subsection Examples
2194
2195 @example
2196 abuffer=sample_rate=44100:sample_fmt=s16p:channel_layout=stereo
2197 @end example
2198
2199 will instruct the source to accept planar 16bit signed stereo at 44100Hz.
2200 Since the sample format with name "s16p" corresponds to the number
2201 6 and the "stereo" channel layout corresponds to the value 0x3, this is
2202 equivalent to:
2203 @example
2204 abuffer=sample_rate=44100:sample_fmt=6:channel_layout=0x3
2205 @end example
2206
2207 @section aevalsrc
2208
2209 Generate an audio signal specified by an expression.
2210
2211 This source accepts in input one or more expressions (one for each
2212 channel), which are evaluated and used to generate a corresponding
2213 audio signal.
2214
2215 This source accepts the following options:
2216
2217 @table @option
2218 @item exprs
2219 Set the '|'-separated expressions list for each separate channel. In case the
2220 @option{channel_layout} option is not specified, the selected channel layout
2221 depends on the number of provided expressions. Otherwise the last
2222 specified expression is applied to the remaining output channels.
2223
2224 @item channel_layout, c
2225 Set the channel layout. The number of channels in the specified layout
2226 must be equal to the number of specified expressions.
2227
2228 @item duration, d
2229 Set the minimum duration of the sourced audio. See
2230 @ref{time duration syntax,,the Time duration section in the ffmpeg-utils(1) manual,ffmpeg-utils}
2231 for the accepted syntax.
2232 Note that the resulting duration may be greater than the specified
2233 duration, as the generated audio is always cut at the end of a
2234 complete frame.
2235
2236 If not specified, or the expressed duration is negative, the audio is
2237 supposed to be generated forever.
2238
2239 @item nb_samples, n
2240 Set the number of samples per channel per each output frame,
2241 default to 1024.
2242
2243 @item sample_rate, s
2244 Specify the sample rate, default to 44100.
2245 @end table
2246
2247 Each expression in @var{exprs} can contain the following constants:
2248
2249 @table @option
2250 @item n
2251 number of the evaluated sample, starting from 0
2252
2253 @item t
2254 time of the evaluated sample expressed in seconds, starting from 0
2255
2256 @item s
2257 sample rate
2258
2259 @end table
2260
2261 @subsection Examples
2262
2263 @itemize
2264 @item
2265 Generate silence:
2266 @example
2267 aevalsrc=0
2268 @end example
2269
2270 @item
2271 Generate a sin signal with frequency of 440 Hz, set sample rate to
2272 8000 Hz:
2273 @example
2274 aevalsrc="sin(440*2*PI*t):s=8000"
2275 @end example
2276
2277 @item
2278 Generate a two channels signal, specify the channel layout (Front
2279 Center + Back Center) explicitly:
2280 @example
2281 aevalsrc="sin(420*2*PI*t)|cos(430*2*PI*t):c=FC|BC"
2282 @end example
2283
2284 @item
2285 Generate white noise:
2286 @example
2287 aevalsrc="-2+random(0)"
2288 @end example
2289
2290 @item
2291 Generate an amplitude modulated signal:
2292 @example
2293 aevalsrc="sin(10*2*PI*t)*sin(880*2*PI*t)"
2294 @end example
2295
2296 @item
2297 Generate 2.5 Hz binaural beats on a 360 Hz carrier:
2298 @example
2299 aevalsrc="0.1*sin(2*PI*(360-2.5/2)*t) | 0.1*sin(2*PI*(360+2.5/2)*t)"
2300 @end example
2301
2302 @end itemize
2303
2304 @section anullsrc
2305
2306 The null audio source, return unprocessed audio frames. It is mainly useful
2307 as a template and to be employed in analysis / debugging tools, or as
2308 the source for filters which ignore the input data (for example the sox
2309 synth filter).
2310
2311 This source accepts the following options:
2312
2313 @table @option
2314
2315 @item channel_layout, cl
2316
2317 Specifies the channel layout, and can be either an integer or a string
2318 representing a channel layout. The default value of @var{channel_layout}
2319 is "stereo".
2320
2321 Check the channel_layout_map definition in
2322 @file{libavutil/channel_layout.c} for the mapping between strings and
2323 channel layout values.
2324
2325 @item sample_rate, r
2326 Specifies the sample rate, and defaults to 44100.
2327
2328 @item nb_samples, n
2329 Set the number of samples per requested frames.
2330
2331 @end table
2332
2333 @subsection Examples
2334
2335 @itemize
2336 @item
2337 Set the sample rate to 48000 Hz and the channel layout to AV_CH_LAYOUT_MONO.
2338 @example
2339 anullsrc=r=48000:cl=4
2340 @end example
2341
2342 @item
2343 Do the same operation with a more obvious syntax:
2344 @example
2345 anullsrc=r=48000:cl=mono
2346 @end example
2347 @end itemize
2348
2349 All the parameters need to be explicitly defined.
2350
2351 @section flite
2352
2353 Synthesize a voice utterance using the libflite library.
2354
2355 To enable compilation of this filter you need to configure FFmpeg with
2356 @code{--enable-libflite}.
2357
2358 Note that the flite library is not thread-safe.
2359
2360 The filter accepts the following options:
2361
2362 @table @option
2363
2364 @item list_voices
2365 If set to 1, list the names of the available voices and exit
2366 immediately. Default value is 0.
2367
2368 @item nb_samples, n
2369 Set the maximum number of samples per frame. Default value is 512.
2370
2371 @item textfile
2372 Set the filename containing the text to speak.
2373
2374 @item text
2375 Set the text to speak.
2376
2377 @item voice, v
2378 Set the voice to use for the speech synthesis. Default value is
2379 @code{kal}. See also the @var{list_voices} option.
2380 @end table
2381
2382 @subsection Examples
2383
2384 @itemize
2385 @item
2386 Read from file @file{speech.txt}, and synthesize the text using the
2387 standard flite voice:
2388 @example
2389 flite=textfile=speech.txt
2390 @end example
2391
2392 @item
2393 Read the specified text selecting the @code{slt} voice:
2394 @example
2395 flite=text='So fare thee well, poor devil of a Sub-Sub, whose commentator I am':voice=slt
2396 @end example
2397
2398 @item
2399 Input text to ffmpeg:
2400 @example
2401 ffmpeg -f lavfi -i flite=text='So fare thee well, poor devil of a Sub-Sub, whose commentator I am':voice=slt
2402 @end example
2403
2404 @item
2405 Make @file{ffplay} speak the specified text, using @code{flite} and
2406 the @code{lavfi} device:
2407 @example
2408 ffplay -f lavfi flite=text='No more be grieved for which that thou hast done.'
2409 @end example
2410 @end itemize
2411
2412 For more information about libflite, check:
2413 @url{http://www.speech.cs.cmu.edu/flite/}
2414
2415 @section sine
2416
2417 Generate an audio signal made of a sine wave with amplitude 1/8.
2418
2419 The audio signal is bit-exact.
2420
2421 The filter accepts the following options:
2422
2423 @table @option
2424
2425 @item frequency, f
2426 Set the carrier frequency. Default is 440 Hz.
2427
2428 @item beep_factor, b
2429 Enable a periodic beep every second with frequency @var{beep_factor} times
2430 the carrier frequency. Default is 0, meaning the beep is disabled.
2431
2432 @item sample_rate, r
2433 Specify the sample rate, default is 44100.
2434
2435 @item duration, d
2436 Specify the duration of the generated audio stream.
2437
2438 @item samples_per_frame
2439 Set the number of samples per output frame, default is 1024.
2440 @end table
2441
2442 @subsection Examples
2443
2444 @itemize
2445
2446 @item
2447 Generate a simple 440 Hz sine wave:
2448 @example
2449 sine
2450 @end example
2451
2452 @item
2453 Generate a 220 Hz sine wave with a 880 Hz beep each second, for 5 seconds:
2454 @example
2455 sine=220:4:d=5
2456 sine=f=220:b=4:d=5
2457 sine=frequency=220:beep_factor=4:duration=5
2458 @end example
2459
2460 @end itemize
2461
2462 @c man end AUDIO SOURCES
2463
2464 @chapter Audio Sinks
2465 @c man begin AUDIO SINKS
2466
2467 Below is a description of the currently available audio sinks.
2468
2469 @section abuffersink
2470
2471 Buffer audio frames, and make them available to the end of filter chain.
2472
2473 This sink is mainly intended for programmatic use, in particular
2474 through the interface defined in @file{libavfilter/buffersink.h}
2475 or the options system.
2476
2477 It accepts a pointer to an AVABufferSinkContext structure, which
2478 defines the incoming buffers' formats, to be passed as the opaque
2479 parameter to @code{avfilter_init_filter} for initialization.
2480 @section anullsink
2481
2482 Null audio sink; do absolutely nothing with the input audio. It is
2483 mainly useful as a template and for use in analysis / debugging
2484 tools.
2485
2486 @c man end AUDIO SINKS
2487
2488 @chapter Video Filters
2489 @c man begin VIDEO FILTERS
2490
2491 When you configure your FFmpeg build, you can disable any of the
2492 existing filters using @code{--disable-filters}.
2493 The configure output will show the video filters included in your
2494 build.
2495
2496 Below is a description of the currently available video filters.
2497
2498 @section alphaextract
2499
2500 Extract the alpha component from the input as a grayscale video. This
2501 is especially useful with the @var{alphamerge} filter.
2502
2503 @section alphamerge
2504
2505 Add or replace the alpha component of the primary input with the
2506 grayscale value of a second input. This is intended for use with
2507 @var{alphaextract} to allow the transmission or storage of frame
2508 sequences that have alpha in a format that doesn't support an alpha
2509 channel.
2510
2511 For example, to reconstruct full frames from a normal YUV-encoded video
2512 and a separate video created with @var{alphaextract}, you might use:
2513 @example
2514 movie=in_alpha.mkv [alpha]; [in][alpha] alphamerge [out]
2515 @end example
2516
2517 Since this filter is designed for reconstruction, it operates on frame
2518 sequences without considering timestamps, and terminates when either
2519 input reaches end of stream. This will cause problems if your encoding
2520 pipeline drops frames. If you're trying to apply an image as an
2521 overlay to a video stream, consider the @var{overlay} filter instead.
2522
2523 @section ass
2524
2525 Same as the @ref{subtitles} filter, except that it doesn't require libavcodec
2526 and libavformat to work. On the other hand, it is limited to ASS (Advanced
2527 Substation Alpha) subtitles files.
2528
2529 This filter accepts the following option in addition to the common options from
2530 the @ref{subtitles} filter:
2531
2532 @table @option
2533 @item shaping
2534 Set the shaping engine
2535
2536 Available values are:
2537 @table @samp
2538 @item auto
2539 The default libass shaping engine, which is the best available.
2540 @item simple
2541 Fast, font-agnostic shaper that can do only substitutions
2542 @item complex
2543 Slower shaper using OpenType for substitutions and positioning
2544 @end table
2545
2546 The default is @code{auto}.
2547 @end table
2548
2549 @section bbox
2550
2551 Compute the bounding box for the non-black pixels in the input frame
2552 luminance plane.
2553
2554 This filter computes the bounding box containing all the pixels with a
2555 luminance value greater than the minimum allowed value.
2556 The parameters describing the bounding box are printed on the filter
2557 log.
2558
2559 The filter accepts the following option:
2560
2561 @table @option
2562 @item min_val
2563 Set the minimal luminance value. Default is @code{16}.
2564 @end table
2565
2566 @section blackdetect
2567
2568 Detect video intervals that are (almost) completely black. Can be
2569 useful to detect chapter transitions, commercials, or invalid
2570 recordings. Output lines contains the time for the start, end and
2571 duration of the detected black interval expressed in seconds.
2572
2573 In order to display the output lines, you need to set the loglevel at
2574 least to the AV_LOG_INFO value.
2575
2576 The filter accepts the following options:
2577
2578 @table @option
2579 @item black_min_duration, d
2580 Set the minimum detected black duration expressed in seconds. It must
2581 be a non-negative floating point number.
2582
2583 Default value is 2.0.
2584
2585 @item picture_black_ratio_th, pic_th
2586 Set the threshold for considering a picture "black".
2587 Express the minimum value for the ratio:
2588 @example
2589 @var{nb_black_pixels} / @var{nb_pixels}
2590 @end example
2591
2592 for which a picture is considered black.
2593 Default value is 0.98.
2594
2595 @item pixel_black_th, pix_th
2596 Set the threshold for considering a pixel "black".
2597
2598 The threshold expresses the maximum pixel luminance value for which a
2599 pixel is considered "black". The provided value is scaled according to
2600 the following equation:
2601 @example
2602 @var{absolute_threshold} = @var{luminance_minimum_value} + @var{pixel_black_th} * @var{luminance_range_size}
2603 @end example
2604
2605 @var{luminance_range_size} and @var{luminance_minimum_value} depend on
2606 the input video format, the range is [0-255] for YUV full-range
2607 formats and [16-235] for YUV non full-range formats.
2608
2609 Default value is 0.10.
2610 @end table
2611
2612 The following example sets the maximum pixel threshold to the minimum
2613 value, and detects only black intervals of 2 or more seconds:
2614 @example
2615 blackdetect=d=2:pix_th=0.00
2616 @end example
2617
2618 @section blackframe
2619
2620 Detect frames that are (almost) completely black. Can be useful to
2621 detect chapter transitions or commercials. Output lines consist of
2622 the frame number of the detected frame, the percentage of blackness,
2623 the position in the file if known or -1 and the timestamp in seconds.
2624
2625 In order to display the output lines, you need to set the loglevel at
2626 least to the AV_LOG_INFO value.
2627
2628 It accepts the following parameters:
2629
2630 @table @option
2631
2632 @item amount
2633 The percentage of the pixels that have to be below the threshold; it defaults to
2634 @code{98}.
2635
2636 @item threshold, thresh
2637 The threshold below which a pixel value is considered black; it defaults to
2638 @code{32}.
2639
2640 @end table
2641
2642 @section blend, tblend
2643
2644 Blend two video frames into each other.
2645
2646 The @code{blend} filter takes two input streams and outputs one
2647 stream, the first input is the "top" layer and second input is
2648 "bottom" layer.  Output terminates when shortest input terminates.
2649
2650 The @code{tblend} (time blend) filter takes two consecutive frames
2651 from one single stream, and outputs the result obtained by blending
2652 the new frame on top of the old frame.
2653
2654 A description of the accepted options follows.
2655
2656 @table @option
2657 @item c0_mode
2658 @item c1_mode
2659 @item c2_mode
2660 @item c3_mode
2661 @item all_mode
2662 Set blend mode for specific pixel component or all pixel components in case
2663 of @var{all_mode}. Default value is @code{normal}.
2664
2665 Available values for component modes are:
2666 @table @samp
2667 @item addition
2668 @item and
2669 @item average
2670 @item burn
2671 @item darken
2672 @item difference
2673 @item difference128
2674 @item divide
2675 @item dodge
2676 @item exclusion
2677 @item hardlight
2678 @item lighten
2679 @item multiply
2680 @item negation
2681 @item normal
2682 @item or
2683 @item overlay
2684 @item phoenix
2685 @item pinlight
2686 @item reflect
2687 @item screen
2688 @item softlight
2689 @item subtract
2690 @item vividlight
2691 @item xor
2692 @end table
2693
2694 @item c0_opacity
2695 @item c1_opacity
2696 @item c2_opacity
2697 @item c3_opacity
2698 @item all_opacity
2699 Set blend opacity for specific pixel component or all pixel components in case
2700 of @var{all_opacity}. Only used in combination with pixel component blend modes.
2701
2702 @item c0_expr
2703 @item c1_expr
2704 @item c2_expr
2705 @item c3_expr
2706 @item all_expr
2707 Set blend expression for specific pixel component or all pixel components in case
2708 of @var{all_expr}. Note that related mode options will be ignored if those are set.
2709
2710 The expressions can use the following variables:
2711
2712 @table @option
2713 @item N
2714 The sequential number of the filtered frame, starting from @code{0}.
2715
2716 @item X
2717 @item Y
2718 the coordinates of the current sample
2719
2720 @item W
2721 @item H
2722 the width and height of currently filtered plane
2723
2724 @item SW
2725 @item SH
2726 Width and height scale depending on the currently filtered plane. It is the
2727 ratio between the corresponding luma plane number of pixels and the current
2728 plane ones. E.g. for YUV4:2:0 the values are @code{1,1} for the luma plane, and
2729 @code{0.5,0.5} for chroma planes.
2730
2731 @item T
2732 Time of the current frame, expressed in seconds.
2733
2734 @item TOP, A
2735 Value of pixel component at current location for first video frame (top layer).
2736
2737 @item BOTTOM, B
2738 Value of pixel component at current location for second video frame (bottom layer).
2739 @end table
2740
2741 @item shortest
2742 Force termination when the shortest input terminates. Default is
2743 @code{0}. This option is only defined for the @code{blend} filter.
2744
2745 @item repeatlast
2746 Continue applying the last bottom frame after the end of the stream. A value of
2747 @code{0} disable the filter after the last frame of the bottom layer is reached.
2748 Default is @code{1}. This option is only defined for the @code{blend} filter.
2749 @end table
2750
2751 @subsection Examples
2752
2753 @itemize
2754 @item
2755 Apply transition from bottom layer to top layer in first 10 seconds:
2756 @example
2757 blend=all_expr='A*(if(gte(T,10),1,T/10))+B*(1-(if(gte(T,10),1,T/10)))'
2758 @end example
2759
2760 @item
2761 Apply 1x1 checkerboard effect:
2762 @example
2763 blend=all_expr='if(eq(mod(X,2),mod(Y,2)),A,B)'
2764 @end example
2765
2766 @item
2767 Apply uncover left effect:
2768 @example
2769 blend=all_expr='if(gte(N*SW+X,W),A,B)'
2770 @end example
2771
2772 @item
2773 Apply uncover down effect:
2774 @example
2775 blend=all_expr='if(gte(Y-N*SH,0),A,B)'
2776 @end example
2777
2778 @item
2779 Apply uncover up-left effect:
2780 @example
2781 blend=all_expr='if(gte(T*SH*40+Y,H)*gte((T*40*SW+X)*W/H,W),A,B)'
2782 @end example
2783
2784 @item
2785 Display differences between the current and the previous frame:
2786 @example
2787 tblend=all_mode=difference128
2788 @end example
2789 @end itemize
2790
2791 @section boxblur
2792
2793 Apply a boxblur algorithm to the input video.
2794
2795 It accepts the following parameters:
2796
2797 @table @option
2798
2799 @item luma_radius, lr
2800 @item luma_power, lp
2801 @item chroma_radius, cr
2802 @item chroma_power, cp
2803 @item alpha_radius, ar
2804 @item alpha_power, ap
2805
2806 @end table
2807
2808 A description of the accepted options follows.
2809
2810 @table @option
2811 @item luma_radius, lr
2812 @item chroma_radius, cr
2813 @item alpha_radius, ar
2814 Set an expression for the box radius in pixels used for blurring the
2815 corresponding input plane.
2816
2817 The radius value must be a non-negative number, and must not be
2818 greater than the value of the expression @code{min(w,h)/2} for the
2819 luma and alpha planes, and of @code{min(cw,ch)/2} for the chroma
2820 planes.
2821
2822 Default value for @option{luma_radius} is "2". If not specified,
2823 @option{chroma_radius} and @option{alpha_radius} default to the
2824 corresponding value set for @option{luma_radius}.
2825
2826 The expressions can contain the following constants:
2827 @table @option
2828 @item w
2829 @item h
2830 The input width and height in pixels.
2831
2832 @item cw
2833 @item ch
2834 The input chroma image width and height in pixels.
2835
2836 @item hsub
2837 @item vsub
2838 The horizontal and vertical chroma subsample values. For example, for the
2839 pixel format "yuv422p", @var{hsub} is 2 and @var{vsub} is 1.
2840 @end table
2841
2842 @item luma_power, lp
2843 @item chroma_power, cp
2844 @item alpha_power, ap
2845 Specify how many times the boxblur filter is applied to the
2846 corresponding plane.
2847
2848 Default value for @option{luma_power} is 2. If not specified,
2849 @option{chroma_power} and @option{alpha_power} default to the
2850 corresponding value set for @option{luma_power}.
2851
2852 A value of 0 will disable the effect.
2853 @end table
2854
2855 @subsection Examples
2856
2857 @itemize
2858 @item
2859 Apply a boxblur filter with the luma, chroma, and alpha radii
2860 set to 2:
2861 @example
2862 boxblur=luma_radius=2:luma_power=1
2863 boxblur=2:1
2864 @end example
2865
2866 @item
2867 Set the luma radius to 2, and alpha and chroma radius to 0:
2868 @example
2869 boxblur=2:1:cr=0:ar=0
2870 @end example
2871
2872 @item
2873 Set the luma and chroma radii to a fraction of the video dimension:
2874 @example
2875 boxblur=luma_radius=min(h\,w)/10:luma_power=1:chroma_radius=min(cw\,ch)/10:chroma_power=1
2876 @end example
2877 @end itemize
2878
2879 @section codecview
2880
2881 Visualize information exported by some codecs.
2882
2883 Some codecs can export information through frames using side-data or other
2884 means. For example, some MPEG based codecs export motion vectors through the
2885 @var{export_mvs} flag in the codec @option{flags2} option.
2886
2887 The filter accepts the following option:
2888
2889 @table @option
2890 @item mv
2891 Set motion vectors to visualize.
2892
2893 Available flags for @var{mv} are:
2894
2895 @table @samp
2896 @item pf
2897 forward predicted MVs of P-frames
2898 @item bf
2899 forward predicted MVs of B-frames
2900 @item bb
2901 backward predicted MVs of B-frames
2902 @end table
2903 @end table
2904
2905 @subsection Examples
2906
2907 @itemize
2908 @item
2909 Visualizes multi-directionals MVs from P and B-Frames using @command{ffplay}:
2910 @example
2911 ffplay -flags2 +export_mvs input.mpg -vf codecview=mv=pf+bf+bb
2912 @end example
2913 @end itemize
2914
2915 @section colorbalance
2916 Modify intensity of primary colors (red, green and blue) of input frames.
2917
2918 The filter allows an input frame to be adjusted in the shadows, midtones or highlights
2919 regions for the red-cyan, green-magenta or blue-yellow balance.
2920
2921 A positive adjustment value shifts the balance towards the primary color, a negative
2922 value towards the complementary color.
2923
2924 The filter accepts the following options:
2925
2926 @table @option
2927 @item rs
2928 @item gs
2929 @item bs
2930 Adjust red, green and blue shadows (darkest pixels).
2931
2932 @item rm
2933 @item gm
2934 @item bm
2935 Adjust red, green and blue midtones (medium pixels).
2936
2937 @item rh
2938 @item gh
2939 @item bh
2940 Adjust red, green and blue highlights (brightest pixels).
2941
2942 Allowed ranges for options are @code{[-1.0, 1.0]}. Defaults are @code{0}.
2943 @end table
2944
2945 @subsection Examples
2946
2947 @itemize
2948 @item
2949 Add red color cast to shadows:
2950 @example
2951 colorbalance=rs=.3
2952 @end example
2953 @end itemize
2954
2955 @section colorlevels
2956
2957 Adjust video input frames using levels.
2958
2959 The filter accepts the following options:
2960
2961 @table @option
2962 @item rimin
2963 @item gimin
2964 @item bimin
2965 @item aimin
2966 Adjust red, green, blue and alpha input black point.
2967 Allowed ranges for options are @code{[-1.0, 1.0]}. Defaults are @code{0}.
2968
2969 @item rimax
2970 @item gimax
2971 @item bimax
2972 @item aimax
2973 Adjust red, green, blue and alpha input white point.
2974 Allowed ranges for options are @code{[-1.0, 1.0]}. Defaults are @code{1}.
2975
2976 Input levels are used to lighten highlights (bright tones), darken shadows
2977 (dark tones), change the balance of bright and dark tones.
2978
2979 @item romin
2980 @item gomin
2981 @item bomin
2982 @item aomin
2983 Adjust red, green, blue and alpha output black point.
2984 Allowed ranges for options are @code{[0, 1.0]}. Defaults are @code{0}.
2985
2986 @item romax
2987 @item gomax
2988 @item bomax
2989 @item aomax
2990 Adjust red, green, blue and alpha output white point.
2991 Allowed ranges for options are @code{[0, 1.0]}. Defaults are @code{1}.
2992
2993 Output levels allows manual selection of a constrained output level range.
2994 @end table
2995
2996 @subsection Examples
2997
2998 @itemize
2999 @item
3000 Make video output darker:
3001 @example
3002 colorlevels=rimin=0.058:gimin=0.058:bimin=0.058
3003 @end example
3004
3005 @item
3006 Increase contrast:
3007 @example
3008 colorlevels=rimin=0.039:gimin=0.039:bimin=0.039:rimax=0.96:gimax=0.96:bimax=0.96
3009 @end example
3010
3011 @item
3012 Make video output lighter:
3013 @example
3014 colorlevels=rimax=0.902:gimax=0.902:bimax=0.902
3015 @end example
3016
3017 @item
3018 Increase brightness:
3019 @example
3020 colorlevels=romin=0.5:gomin=0.5:bomin=0.5
3021 @end example
3022 @end itemize
3023
3024 @section colorchannelmixer
3025
3026 Adjust video input frames by re-mixing color channels.
3027
3028 This filter modifies a color channel by adding the values associated to
3029 the other channels of the same pixels. For example if the value to
3030 modify is red, the output value will be:
3031 @example
3032 @var{red}=@var{red}*@var{rr} + @var{blue}*@var{rb} + @var{green}*@var{rg} + @var{alpha}*@var{ra}
3033 @end example
3034
3035 The filter accepts the following options:
3036
3037 @table @option
3038 @item rr
3039 @item rg
3040 @item rb
3041 @item ra
3042 Adjust contribution of input red, green, blue and alpha channels for output red channel.
3043 Default is @code{1} for @var{rr}, and @code{0} for @var{rg}, @var{rb} and @var{ra}.
3044
3045 @item gr
3046 @item gg
3047 @item gb
3048 @item ga
3049 Adjust contribution of input red, green, blue and alpha channels for output green channel.
3050 Default is @code{1} for @var{gg}, and @code{0} for @var{gr}, @var{gb} and @var{ga}.
3051
3052 @item br
3053 @item bg
3054 @item bb
3055 @item ba
3056 Adjust contribution of input red, green, blue and alpha channels for output blue channel.
3057 Default is @code{1} for @var{bb}, and @code{0} for @var{br}, @var{bg} and @var{ba}.
3058
3059 @item ar
3060 @item ag
3061 @item ab
3062 @item aa
3063 Adjust contribution of input red, green, blue and alpha channels for output alpha channel.
3064 Default is @code{1} for @var{aa}, and @code{0} for @var{ar}, @var{ag} and @var{ab}.
3065
3066 Allowed ranges for options are @code{[-2.0, 2.0]}.
3067 @end table
3068
3069 @subsection Examples
3070
3071 @itemize
3072 @item
3073 Convert source to grayscale:
3074 @example
3075 colorchannelmixer=.3:.4:.3:0:.3:.4:.3:0:.3:.4:.3
3076 @end example
3077 @item
3078 Simulate sepia tones:
3079 @example
3080 colorchannelmixer=.393:.769:.189:0:.349:.686:.168:0:.272:.534:.131
3081 @end example
3082 @end itemize
3083
3084 @section colormatrix
3085
3086 Convert color matrix.
3087
3088 The filter accepts the following options:
3089
3090 @table @option
3091 @item src
3092 @item dst
3093 Specify the source and destination color matrix. Both values must be
3094 specified.
3095
3096 The accepted values are:
3097 @table @samp
3098 @item bt709
3099 BT.709
3100
3101 @item bt601
3102 BT.601
3103
3104 @item smpte240m
3105 SMPTE-240M
3106
3107 @item fcc
3108 FCC
3109 @end table
3110 @end table
3111
3112 For example to convert from BT.601 to SMPTE-240M, use the command:
3113 @example
3114 colormatrix=bt601:smpte240m
3115 @end example
3116
3117 @section copy
3118
3119 Copy the input source unchanged to the output. This is mainly useful for
3120 testing purposes.
3121
3122 @section crop
3123
3124 Crop the input video to given dimensions.
3125
3126 It accepts the following parameters:
3127
3128 @table @option
3129 @item w, out_w
3130 The width of the output video. It defaults to @code{iw}.
3131 This expression is evaluated only once during the filter
3132 configuration.
3133
3134 @item h, out_h
3135 The height of the output video. It defaults to @code{ih}.
3136 This expression is evaluated only once during the filter
3137 configuration.
3138
3139 @item x
3140 The horizontal position, in the input video, of the left edge of the output
3141 video. It defaults to @code{(in_w-out_w)/2}.
3142 This expression is evaluated per-frame.
3143
3144 @item y
3145 The vertical position, in the input video, of the top edge of the output video.
3146 It defaults to @code{(in_h-out_h)/2}.
3147 This expression is evaluated per-frame.
3148
3149 @item keep_aspect
3150 If set to 1 will force the output display aspect ratio
3151 to be the same of the input, by changing the output sample aspect
3152 ratio. It defaults to 0.
3153 @end table
3154
3155 The @var{out_w}, @var{out_h}, @var{x}, @var{y} parameters are
3156 expressions containing the following constants:
3157
3158 @table @option
3159 @item x
3160 @item y
3161 The computed values for @var{x} and @var{y}. They are evaluated for
3162 each new frame.
3163
3164 @item in_w
3165 @item in_h
3166 The input width and height.
3167
3168 @item iw
3169 @item ih
3170 These are the same as @var{in_w} and @var{in_h}.
3171
3172 @item out_w
3173 @item out_h
3174 The output (cropped) width and height.
3175
3176 @item ow
3177 @item oh
3178 These are the same as @var{out_w} and @var{out_h}.
3179
3180 @item a
3181 same as @var{iw} / @var{ih}
3182
3183 @item sar
3184 input sample aspect ratio
3185
3186 @item dar
3187 input display aspect ratio, it is the same as (@var{iw} / @var{ih}) * @var{sar}
3188
3189 @item hsub
3190 @item vsub
3191 horizontal and vertical chroma subsample values. For example for the
3192 pixel format "yuv422p" @var{hsub} is 2 and @var{vsub} is 1.
3193
3194 @item n
3195 The number of the input frame, starting from 0.
3196
3197 @item pos
3198 the position in the file of the input frame, NAN if unknown
3199
3200 @item t
3201 The timestamp expressed in seconds. It's NAN if the input timestamp is unknown.
3202
3203 @end table
3204
3205 The expression for @var{out_w} may depend on the value of @var{out_h},
3206 and the expression for @var{out_h} may depend on @var{out_w}, but they
3207 cannot depend on @var{x} and @var{y}, as @var{x} and @var{y} are
3208 evaluated after @var{out_w} and @var{out_h}.
3209
3210 The @var{x} and @var{y} parameters specify the expressions for the
3211 position of the top-left corner of the output (non-cropped) area. They
3212 are evaluated for each frame. If the evaluated value is not valid, it
3213 is approximated to the nearest valid value.
3214
3215 The expression for @var{x} may depend on @var{y}, and the expression
3216 for @var{y} may depend on @var{x}.
3217
3218 @subsection Examples
3219
3220 @itemize
3221 @item
3222 Crop area with size 100x100 at position (12,34).
3223 @example
3224 crop=100:100:12:34
3225 @end example
3226
3227 Using named options, the example above becomes:
3228 @example
3229 crop=w=100:h=100:x=12:y=34
3230 @end example
3231
3232 @item
3233 Crop the central input area with size 100x100:
3234 @example
3235 crop=100:100
3236 @end example
3237
3238 @item
3239 Crop the central input area with size 2/3 of the input video:
3240 @example
3241 crop=2/3*in_w:2/3*in_h
3242 @end example
3243
3244 @item
3245 Crop the input video central square:
3246 @example
3247 crop=out_w=in_h
3248 crop=in_h
3249 @end example
3250
3251 @item
3252 Delimit the rectangle with the top-left corner placed at position
3253 100:100 and the right-bottom corner corresponding to the right-bottom
3254 corner of the input image.
3255 @example
3256 crop=in_w-100:in_h-100:100:100
3257 @end example
3258
3259 @item
3260 Crop 10 pixels from the left and right borders, and 20 pixels from
3261 the top and bottom borders
3262 @example
3263 crop=in_w-2*10:in_h-2*20
3264 @end example
3265
3266 @item
3267 Keep only the bottom right quarter of the input image:
3268 @example
3269 crop=in_w/2:in_h/2:in_w/2:in_h/2
3270 @end example
3271
3272 @item
3273 Crop height for getting Greek harmony:
3274 @example
3275 crop=in_w:1/PHI*in_w
3276 @end example
3277
3278 @item
3279 Apply trembling effect:
3280 @example
3281 crop=in_w/2:in_h/2:(in_w-out_w)/2+((in_w-out_w)/2)*sin(n/10):(in_h-out_h)/2 +((in_h-out_h)/2)*sin(n/7)
3282 @end example
3283
3284 @item
3285 Apply erratic camera effect depending on timestamp:
3286 @example
3287 crop=in_w/2:in_h/2:(in_w-out_w)/2+((in_w-out_w)/2)*sin(t*10):(in_h-out_h)/2 +((in_h-out_h)/2)*sin(t*13)"
3288 @end example
3289
3290 @item
3291 Set x depending on the value of y:
3292 @example
3293 crop=in_w/2:in_h/2:y:10+10*sin(n/10)
3294 @end example
3295 @end itemize
3296
3297 @section cropdetect
3298
3299 Auto-detect the crop size.
3300
3301 It calculates the necessary cropping parameters and prints the
3302 recommended parameters via the logging system. The detected dimensions
3303 correspond to the non-black area of the input video.
3304
3305 It accepts the following parameters:
3306
3307 @table @option
3308
3309 @item limit
3310 Set higher black value threshold, which can be optionally specified
3311 from nothing (0) to everything (255 for 8bit based formats). An intensity
3312 value greater to the set value is considered non-black. It defaults to 24.
3313 You can also specify a value between 0.0 and 1.0 which will be scaled depending
3314 on the bitdepth of the pixel format.
3315
3316 @item round
3317 The value which the width/height should be divisible by. It defaults to
3318 16. The offset is automatically adjusted to center the video. Use 2 to
3319 get only even dimensions (needed for 4:2:2 video). 16 is best when
3320 encoding to most video codecs.
3321
3322 @item reset_count, reset
3323 Set the counter that determines after how many frames cropdetect will
3324 reset the previously detected largest video area and start over to
3325 detect the current optimal crop area. Default value is 0.
3326
3327 This can be useful when channel logos distort the video area. 0
3328 indicates 'never reset', and returns the largest area encountered during
3329 playback.
3330 @end table
3331
3332 @anchor{curves}
3333 @section curves
3334
3335 Apply color adjustments using curves.
3336
3337 This filter is similar to the Adobe Photoshop and GIMP curves tools. Each
3338 component (red, green and blue) has its values defined by @var{N} key points
3339 tied from each other using a smooth curve. The x-axis represents the pixel
3340 values from the input frame, and the y-axis the new pixel values to be set for
3341 the output frame.
3342
3343 By default, a component curve is defined by the two points @var{(0;0)} and
3344 @var{(1;1)}. This creates a straight line where each original pixel value is
3345 "adjusted" to its own value, which means no change to the image.
3346
3347 The filter allows you to redefine these two points and add some more. A new
3348 curve (using a natural cubic spline interpolation) will be define to pass
3349 smoothly through all these new coordinates. The new defined points needs to be
3350 strictly increasing over the x-axis, and their @var{x} and @var{y} values must
3351 be in the @var{[0;1]} interval.  If the computed curves happened to go outside
3352 the vector spaces, the values will be clipped accordingly.
3353
3354 If there is no key point defined in @code{x=0}, the filter will automatically
3355 insert a @var{(0;0)} point. In the same way, if there is no key point defined
3356 in @code{x=1}, the filter will automatically insert a @var{(1;1)} point.
3357
3358 The filter accepts the following options:
3359
3360 @table @option
3361 @item preset
3362 Select one of the available color presets. This option can be used in addition
3363 to the @option{r}, @option{g}, @option{b} parameters; in this case, the later
3364 options takes priority on the preset values.
3365 Available presets are:
3366 @table @samp
3367 @item none
3368 @item color_negative
3369 @item cross_process
3370 @item darker
3371 @item increase_contrast
3372 @item lighter
3373 @item linear_contrast
3374 @item medium_contrast
3375 @item negative
3376 @item strong_contrast
3377 @item vintage
3378 @end table
3379 Default is @code{none}.
3380 @item master, m
3381 Set the master key points. These points will define a second pass mapping. It
3382 is sometimes called a "luminance" or "value" mapping. It can be used with
3383 @option{r}, @option{g}, @option{b} or @option{all} since it acts like a
3384 post-processing LUT.
3385 @item red, r
3386 Set the key points for the red component.
3387 @item green, g
3388 Set the key points for the green component.
3389 @item blue, b
3390 Set the key points for the blue component.
3391 @item all
3392 Set the key points for all components (not including master).
3393 Can be used in addition to the other key points component
3394 options. In this case, the unset component(s) will fallback on this
3395 @option{all} setting.
3396 @item psfile
3397 Specify a Photoshop curves file (@code{.asv}) to import the settings from.
3398 @end table
3399
3400 To avoid some filtergraph syntax conflicts, each key points list need to be
3401 defined using the following syntax: @code{x0/y0 x1/y1 x2/y2 ...}.
3402
3403 @subsection Examples
3404
3405 @itemize
3406 @item
3407 Increase slightly the middle level of blue:
3408 @example
3409 curves=blue='0.5/0.58'
3410 @end example
3411
3412 @item
3413 Vintage effect:
3414 @example
3415 curves=r='0/0.11 .42/.51 1/0.95':g='0.50/0.48':b='0/0.22 .49/.44 1/0.8'
3416 @end example
3417 Here we obtain the following coordinates for each components:
3418 @table @var
3419 @item red
3420 @code{(0;0.11) (0.42;0.51) (1;0.95)}
3421 @item green
3422 @code{(0;0) (0.50;0.48) (1;1)}
3423 @item blue
3424 @code{(0;0.22) (0.49;0.44) (1;0.80)}
3425 @end table
3426
3427 @item
3428 The previous example can also be achieved with the associated built-in preset:
3429 @example
3430 curves=preset=vintage
3431 @end example
3432
3433 @item
3434 Or simply:
3435 @example
3436 curves=vintage
3437 @end example
3438
3439 @item
3440 Use a Photoshop preset and redefine the points of the green component:
3441 @example
3442 curves=psfile='MyCurvesPresets/purple.asv':green='0.45/0.53'
3443 @end example
3444 @end itemize
3445
3446 @section dctdnoiz
3447
3448 Denoise frames using 2D DCT (frequency domain filtering).
3449
3450 This filter is not designed for real time.
3451
3452 The filter accepts the following options:
3453
3454 @table @option
3455 @item sigma, s
3456 Set the noise sigma constant.
3457
3458 This @var{sigma} defines a hard threshold of @code{3 * sigma}; every DCT
3459 coefficient (absolute value) below this threshold with be dropped.
3460
3461 If you need a more advanced filtering, see @option{expr}.
3462
3463 Default is @code{0}.
3464
3465 @item overlap
3466 Set number overlapping pixels for each block. Since the filter can be slow, you
3467 may want to reduce this value, at the cost of a less effective filter and the
3468 risk of various artefacts.
3469
3470 If the overlapping value doesn't allow to process the whole input width or
3471 height, a warning will be displayed and according borders won't be denoised.
3472
3473 Default value is @var{blocksize}-1, which is the best possible setting.
3474
3475 @item expr, e
3476 Set the coefficient factor expression.
3477
3478 For each coefficient of a DCT block, this expression will be evaluated as a
3479 multiplier value for the coefficient.
3480
3481 If this is option is set, the @option{sigma} option will be ignored.
3482
3483 The absolute value of the coefficient can be accessed through the @var{c}
3484 variable.
3485
3486 @item n
3487 Set the @var{blocksize} using the number of bits. @code{1<<@var{n}} defines the
3488 @var{blocksize}, which is the width and height of the processed blocks.
3489
3490 The default value is @var{3} (8x8) and can be raised to @var{4} for a
3491 @var{blocksize} of 16x16. Note that changing this setting has huge consequences
3492 on the speed processing. Also, a larger block size does not necessarily means a
3493 better de-noising.
3494 @end table
3495
3496 @subsection Examples
3497
3498 Apply a denoise with a @option{sigma} of @code{4.5}:
3499 @example
3500 dctdnoiz=4.5
3501 @end example
3502
3503 The same operation can be achieved using the expression system:
3504 @example
3505 dctdnoiz=e='gte(c, 4.5*3)'
3506 @end example
3507
3508 Violent denoise using a block size of @code{16x16}:
3509 @example
3510 dctdnoiz=15:n=4
3511 @end example
3512
3513 @anchor{decimate}
3514 @section decimate
3515
3516 Drop duplicated frames at regular intervals.
3517
3518 The filter accepts the following options:
3519
3520 @table @option
3521 @item cycle
3522 Set the number of frames from which one will be dropped. Setting this to
3523 @var{N} means one frame in every batch of @var{N} frames will be dropped.
3524 Default is @code{5}.
3525
3526 @item dupthresh
3527 Set the threshold for duplicate detection. If the difference metric for a frame
3528 is less than or equal to this value, then it is declared as duplicate. Default
3529 is @code{1.1}
3530
3531 @item scthresh
3532 Set scene change threshold. Default is @code{15}.
3533
3534 @item blockx
3535 @item blocky
3536 Set the size of the x and y-axis blocks used during metric calculations.
3537 Larger blocks give better noise suppression, but also give worse detection of
3538 small movements. Must be a power of two. Default is @code{32}.
3539
3540 @item ppsrc
3541 Mark main input as a pre-processed input and activate clean source input
3542 stream. This allows the input to be pre-processed with various filters to help
3543 the metrics calculation while keeping the frame selection lossless. When set to
3544 @code{1}, the first stream is for the pre-processed input, and the second
3545 stream is the clean source from where the kept frames are chosen. Default is
3546 @code{0}.
3547
3548 @item chroma
3549 Set whether or not chroma is considered in the metric calculations. Default is
3550 @code{1}.
3551 @end table
3552
3553 @section dejudder
3554
3555 Remove judder produced by partially interlaced telecined content.
3556
3557 Judder can be introduced, for instance, by @ref{pullup} filter. If the original
3558 source was partially telecined content then the output of @code{pullup,dejudder}
3559 will have a variable frame rate. May change the recorded frame rate of the
3560 container. Aside from that change, this filter will not affect constant frame
3561 rate video.
3562
3563 The option available in this filter is:
3564 @table @option
3565
3566 @item cycle
3567 Specify the length of the window over which the judder repeats.
3568
3569 Accepts any integer greater than 1. Useful values are:
3570 @table @samp
3571
3572 @item 4
3573 If the original was telecined from 24 to 30 fps (Film to NTSC).
3574
3575 @item 5
3576 If the original was telecined from 25 to 30 fps (PAL to NTSC).
3577
3578 @item 20
3579 If a mixture of the two.
3580 @end table
3581
3582 The default is @samp{4}.
3583 @end table
3584
3585 @section delogo
3586
3587 Suppress a TV station logo by a simple interpolation of the surrounding
3588 pixels. Just set a rectangle covering the logo and watch it disappear
3589 (and sometimes something even uglier appear - your mileage may vary).
3590
3591 It accepts the following parameters:
3592 @table @option
3593
3594 @item x
3595 @item y
3596 Specify the top left corner coordinates of the logo. They must be
3597 specified.
3598
3599 @item w
3600 @item h
3601 Specify the width and height of the logo to clear. They must be
3602 specified.
3603
3604 @item band, t
3605 Specify the thickness of the fuzzy edge of the rectangle (added to
3606 @var{w} and @var{h}). The default value is 4.
3607
3608 @item show
3609 When set to 1, a green rectangle is drawn on the screen to simplify
3610 finding the right @var{x}, @var{y}, @var{w}, and @var{h} parameters.
3611 The default value is 0.
3612
3613 The rectangle is drawn on the outermost pixels which will be (partly)
3614 replaced with interpolated values. The values of the next pixels
3615 immediately outside this rectangle in each direction will be used to
3616 compute the interpolated pixel values inside the rectangle.
3617
3618 @end table
3619
3620 @subsection Examples
3621
3622 @itemize
3623 @item
3624 Set a rectangle covering the area with top left corner coordinates 0,0
3625 and size 100x77, and a band of size 10:
3626 @example
3627 delogo=x=0:y=0:w=100:h=77:band=10
3628 @end example
3629
3630 @end itemize
3631
3632 @section deshake
3633
3634 Attempt to fix small changes in horizontal and/or vertical shift. This
3635 filter helps remove camera shake from hand-holding a camera, bumping a
3636 tripod, moving on a vehicle, etc.
3637
3638 The filter accepts the following options:
3639
3640 @table @option
3641
3642 @item x
3643 @item y
3644 @item w
3645 @item h
3646 Specify a rectangular area where to limit the search for motion
3647 vectors.
3648 If desired the search for motion vectors can be limited to a
3649 rectangular area of the frame defined by its top left corner, width
3650 and height. These parameters have the same meaning as the drawbox
3651 filter which can be used to visualise the position of the bounding
3652 box.
3653
3654 This is useful when simultaneous movement of subjects within the frame
3655 might be confused for camera motion by the motion vector search.
3656
3657 If any or all of @var{x}, @var{y}, @var{w} and @var{h} are set to -1
3658 then the full frame is used. This allows later options to be set
3659 without specifying the bounding box for the motion vector search.
3660
3661 Default - search the whole frame.
3662
3663 @item rx
3664 @item ry
3665 Specify the maximum extent of movement in x and y directions in the
3666 range 0-64 pixels. Default 16.
3667
3668 @item edge
3669 Specify how to generate pixels to fill blanks at the edge of the
3670 frame. Available values are:
3671 @table @samp
3672 @item blank, 0
3673 Fill zeroes at blank locations
3674 @item original, 1
3675 Original image at blank locations
3676 @item clamp, 2
3677 Extruded edge value at blank locations
3678 @item mirror, 3
3679 Mirrored edge at blank locations
3680 @end table
3681 Default value is @samp{mirror}.
3682
3683 @item blocksize
3684 Specify the blocksize to use for motion search. Range 4-128 pixels,
3685 default 8.
3686
3687 @item contrast
3688 Specify the contrast threshold for blocks. Only blocks with more than
3689 the specified contrast (difference between darkest and lightest
3690 pixels) will be considered. Range 1-255, default 125.
3691
3692 @item search
3693 Specify the search strategy. Available values are:
3694 @table @samp
3695 @item exhaustive, 0
3696 Set exhaustive search
3697 @item less, 1
3698 Set less exhaustive search.
3699 @end table
3700 Default value is @samp{exhaustive}.
3701
3702 @item filename
3703 If set then a detailed log of the motion search is written to the
3704 specified file.
3705
3706 @item opencl
3707 If set to 1, specify using OpenCL capabilities, only available if
3708 FFmpeg was configured with @code{--enable-opencl}. Default value is 0.
3709
3710 @end table
3711
3712 @section drawbox
3713
3714 Draw a colored box on the input image.
3715
3716 It accepts the following parameters:
3717
3718 @table @option
3719 @item x
3720 @item y
3721 The expressions which specify the top left corner coordinates of the box. It defaults to 0.
3722
3723 @item width, w
3724 @item height, h
3725 The expressions which specify the width and height of the box; if 0 they are interpreted as
3726 the input width and height. It defaults to 0.
3727
3728 @item color, c
3729 Specify the color of the box to write. For the general syntax of this option,
3730 check the "Color" section in the ffmpeg-utils manual. If the special
3731 value @code{invert} is used, the box edge color is the same as the
3732 video with inverted luma.
3733
3734 @item thickness, t
3735 The expression which sets the thickness of the box edge. Default value is @code{3}.
3736
3737 See below for the list of accepted constants.
3738 @end table
3739
3740 The parameters for @var{x}, @var{y}, @var{w} and @var{h} and @var{t} are expressions containing the
3741 following constants:
3742
3743 @table @option
3744 @item dar
3745 The input display aspect ratio, it is the same as (@var{w} / @var{h}) * @var{sar}.
3746
3747 @item hsub
3748 @item vsub
3749 horizontal and vertical chroma subsample values. For example for the
3750 pixel format "yuv422p" @var{hsub} is 2 and @var{vsub} is 1.
3751
3752 @item in_h, ih
3753 @item in_w, iw
3754 The input width and height.
3755
3756 @item sar
3757 The input sample aspect ratio.
3758
3759 @item x
3760 @item y
3761 The x and y offset coordinates where the box is drawn.
3762
3763 @item w
3764 @item h
3765 The width and height of the drawn box.
3766
3767 @item t
3768 The thickness of the drawn box.
3769
3770 These constants allow the @var{x}, @var{y}, @var{w}, @var{h} and @var{t} expressions to refer to
3771 each other, so you may for example specify @code{y=x/dar} or @code{h=w/dar}.
3772
3773 @end table
3774
3775 @subsection Examples
3776
3777 @itemize
3778 @item
3779 Draw a black box around the edge of the input image:
3780 @example
3781 drawbox
3782 @end example
3783
3784 @item
3785 Draw a box with color red and an opacity of 50%:
3786 @example
3787 drawbox=10:20:200:60:red@@0.5
3788 @end example
3789
3790 The previous example can be specified as:
3791 @example
3792 drawbox=x=10:y=20:w=200:h=60:color=red@@0.5
3793 @end example
3794
3795 @item
3796 Fill the box with pink color:
3797 @example
3798 drawbox=x=10:y=10:w=100:h=100:color=pink@@0.5:t=max
3799 @end example
3800
3801 @item
3802 Draw a 2-pixel red 2.40:1 mask:
3803 @example
3804 drawbox=x=-t:y=0.5*(ih-iw/2.4)-t:w=iw+t*2:h=iw/2.4+t*2:t=2:c=red
3805 @end example
3806 @end itemize
3807
3808 @section drawgrid
3809
3810 Draw a grid on the input image.
3811
3812 It accepts the following parameters:
3813
3814 @table @option
3815 @item x
3816 @item y
3817 The expressions which specify the coordinates of some point of grid intersection (meant to configure offset). Both default to 0.
3818
3819 @item width, w
3820 @item height, h
3821 The expressions which specify the width and height of the grid cell, if 0 they are interpreted as the
3822 input width and height, respectively, minus @code{thickness}, so image gets
3823 framed. Default to 0.
3824
3825 @item color, c
3826 Specify the color of the grid. For the general syntax of this option,
3827 check the "Color" section in the ffmpeg-utils manual. If the special
3828 value @code{invert} is used, the grid color is the same as the
3829 video with inverted luma.
3830
3831 @item thickness, t
3832 The expression which sets the thickness of the grid line. Default value is @code{1}.
3833
3834 See below for the list of accepted constants.
3835 @end table
3836
3837 The parameters for @var{x}, @var{y}, @var{w} and @var{h} and @var{t} are expressions containing the
3838 following constants:
3839
3840 @table @option
3841 @item dar
3842 The input display aspect ratio, it is the same as (@var{w} / @var{h}) * @var{sar}.
3843
3844 @item hsub
3845 @item vsub
3846 horizontal and vertical chroma subsample values. For example for the
3847 pixel format "yuv422p" @var{hsub} is 2 and @var{vsub} is 1.
3848
3849 @item in_h, ih
3850 @item in_w, iw
3851 The input grid cell width and height.
3852
3853 @item sar
3854 The input sample aspect ratio.
3855
3856 @item x
3857 @item y
3858 The x and y coordinates of some point of grid intersection (meant to configure offset).
3859
3860 @item w
3861 @item h
3862 The width and height of the drawn cell.
3863
3864 @item t
3865 The thickness of the drawn cell.
3866
3867 These constants allow the @var{x}, @var{y}, @var{w}, @var{h} and @var{t} expressions to refer to
3868 each other, so you may for example specify @code{y=x/dar} or @code{h=w/dar}.
3869
3870 @end table
3871
3872 @subsection Examples
3873
3874 @itemize
3875 @item
3876 Draw a grid with cell 100x100 pixels, thickness 2 pixels, with color red and an opacity of 50%:
3877 @example
3878 drawgrid=width=100:height=100:thickness=2:color=red@@0.5
3879 @end example
3880
3881 @item
3882 Draw a white 3x3 grid with an opacity of 50%:
3883 @example
3884 drawgrid=w=iw/3:h=ih/3:t=2:c=white@@0.5
3885 @end example
3886 @end itemize
3887
3888 @anchor{drawtext}
3889 @section drawtext
3890
3891 Draw a text string or text from a specified file on top of a video, using the
3892 libfreetype library.
3893
3894 To enable compilation of this filter, you need to configure FFmpeg with
3895 @code{--enable-libfreetype}.
3896 To enable default font fallback and the @var{font} option you need to
3897 configure FFmpeg with @code{--enable-libfontconfig}.
3898 To enable the @var{text_shaping} option, you need to configure FFmpeg with
3899 @code{--enable-libfribidi}.
3900
3901 @subsection Syntax
3902
3903 It accepts the following parameters:
3904
3905 @table @option
3906
3907 @item box
3908 Used to draw a box around text using the background color.
3909 The value must be either 1 (enable) or 0 (disable).
3910 The default value of @var{box} is 0.
3911
3912 @item boxcolor
3913 The color to be used for drawing box around text. For the syntax of this
3914 option, check the "Color" section in the ffmpeg-utils manual.
3915
3916 The default value of @var{boxcolor} is "white".
3917
3918 @item borderw
3919 Set the width of the border to be drawn around the text using @var{bordercolor}.
3920 The default value of @var{borderw} is 0.
3921
3922 @item bordercolor
3923 Set the color to be used for drawing border around text. For the syntax of this
3924 option, check the "Color" section in the ffmpeg-utils manual.
3925
3926 The default value of @var{bordercolor} is "black".
3927
3928 @item expansion
3929 Select how the @var{text} is expanded. Can be either @code{none},
3930 @code{strftime} (deprecated) or
3931 @code{normal} (default). See the @ref{drawtext_expansion, Text expansion} section
3932 below for details.
3933
3934 @item fix_bounds
3935 If true, check and fix text coords to avoid clipping.
3936
3937 @item fontcolor
3938 The color to be used for drawing fonts. For the syntax of this option, check
3939 the "Color" section in the ffmpeg-utils manual.
3940
3941 The default value of @var{fontcolor} is "black".
3942
3943 @item fontcolor_expr
3944 String which is expanded the same way as @var{text} to obtain dynamic
3945 @var{fontcolor} value. By default this option has empty value and is not
3946 processed. When this option is set, it overrides @var{fontcolor} option.
3947
3948 @item font
3949 The font family to be used for drawing text. By default Sans.
3950
3951 @item fontfile
3952 The font file to be used for drawing text. The path must be included.
3953 This parameter is mandatory if the fontconfig support is disabled.
3954
3955 @item fontsize
3956 The font size to be used for drawing text.
3957 The default value of @var{fontsize} is 16.
3958
3959 @item text_shaping
3960 If set to 1, attempt to shape the text (for example, reverse the order of
3961 right-to-left text and join Arabic characters) before drawing it.
3962 Otherwise, just draw the text exactly as given.
3963 By default 1 (if supported).
3964
3965 @item ft_load_flags
3966 The flags to be used for loading the fonts.
3967
3968 The flags map the corresponding flags supported by libfreetype, and are
3969 a combination of the following values:
3970 @table @var
3971 @item default
3972 @item no_scale
3973 @item no_hinting
3974 @item render
3975 @item no_bitmap
3976 @item vertical_layout
3977 @item force_autohint
3978 @item crop_bitmap
3979 @item pedantic
3980 @item ignore_global_advance_width
3981 @item no_recurse
3982 @item ignore_transform
3983 @item monochrome
3984 @item linear_design
3985 @item no_autohint
3986 @end table
3987
3988 Default value is "default".
3989
3990 For more information consult the documentation for the FT_LOAD_*
3991 libfreetype flags.
3992
3993 @item shadowcolor
3994 The color to be used for drawing a shadow behind the drawn text. For the
3995 syntax of this option, check the "Color" section in the ffmpeg-utils manual.
3996
3997 The default value of @var{shadowcolor} is "black".
3998
3999 @item shadowx
4000 @item shadowy
4001 The x and y offsets for the text shadow position with respect to the
4002 position of the text. They can be either positive or negative
4003 values. The default value for both is "0".
4004
4005 @item start_number
4006 The starting frame number for the n/frame_num variable. The default value
4007 is "0".
4008
4009 @item tabsize
4010 The size in number of spaces to use for rendering the tab.
4011 Default value is 4.
4012
4013 @item timecode
4014 Set the initial timecode representation in "hh:mm:ss[:;.]ff"
4015 format. It can be used with or without text parameter. @var{timecode_rate}
4016 option must be specified.
4017
4018 @item timecode_rate, rate, r
4019 Set the timecode frame rate (timecode only).
4020
4021 @item text
4022 The text string to be drawn. The text must be a sequence of UTF-8
4023 encoded characters.
4024 This parameter is mandatory if no file is specified with the parameter
4025 @var{textfile}.
4026
4027 @item textfile
4028 A text file containing text to be drawn. The text must be a sequence
4029 of UTF-8 encoded characters.
4030
4031 This parameter is mandatory if no text string is specified with the
4032 parameter @var{text}.
4033
4034 If both @var{text} and @var{textfile} are specified, an error is thrown.
4035
4036 @item reload
4037 If set to 1, the @var{textfile} will be reloaded before each frame.
4038 Be sure to update it atomically, or it may be read partially, or even fail.
4039
4040 @item x
4041 @item y
4042 The expressions which specify the offsets where text will be drawn
4043 within the video frame. They are relative to the top/left border of the
4044 output image.
4045
4046 The default value of @var{x} and @var{y} is "0".
4047
4048 See below for the list of accepted constants and functions.
4049 @end table
4050
4051 The parameters for @var{x} and @var{y} are expressions containing the
4052 following constants and functions:
4053
4054 @table @option
4055 @item dar
4056 input display aspect ratio, it is the same as (@var{w} / @var{h}) * @var{sar}
4057
4058 @item hsub
4059 @item vsub
4060 horizontal and vertical chroma subsample values. For example for the
4061 pixel format "yuv422p" @var{hsub} is 2 and @var{vsub} is 1.
4062
4063 @item line_h, lh
4064 the height of each text line
4065
4066 @item main_h, h, H
4067 the input height
4068
4069 @item main_w, w, W
4070 the input width
4071
4072 @item max_glyph_a, ascent
4073 the maximum distance from the baseline to the highest/upper grid
4074 coordinate used to place a glyph outline point, for all the rendered
4075 glyphs.
4076 It is a positive value, due to the grid's orientation with the Y axis
4077 upwards.
4078
4079 @item max_glyph_d, descent
4080 the maximum distance from the baseline to the lowest grid coordinate
4081 used to place a glyph outline point, for all the rendered glyphs.
4082 This is a negative value, due to the grid's orientation, with the Y axis
4083 upwards.
4084
4085 @item max_glyph_h
4086 maximum glyph height, that is the maximum height for all the glyphs
4087 contained in the rendered text, it is equivalent to @var{ascent} -
4088 @var{descent}.
4089
4090 @item max_glyph_w
4091 maximum glyph width, that is the maximum width for all the glyphs
4092 contained in the rendered text
4093
4094 @item n
4095 the number of input frame, starting from 0
4096
4097 @item rand(min, max)
4098 return a random number included between @var{min} and @var{max}
4099
4100 @item sar
4101 The input sample aspect ratio.
4102
4103 @item t
4104 timestamp expressed in seconds, NAN if the input timestamp is unknown
4105
4106 @item text_h, th
4107 the height of the rendered text
4108
4109 @item text_w, tw
4110 the width of the rendered text
4111
4112 @item x
4113 @item y
4114 the x and y offset coordinates where the text is drawn.
4115
4116 These parameters allow the @var{x} and @var{y} expressions to refer
4117 each other, so you can for example specify @code{y=x/dar}.
4118 @end table
4119
4120 @anchor{drawtext_expansion}
4121 @subsection Text expansion
4122
4123 If @option{expansion} is set to @code{strftime},
4124 the filter recognizes strftime() sequences in the provided text and
4125 expands them accordingly. Check the documentation of strftime(). This
4126 feature is deprecated.
4127
4128 If @option{expansion} is set to @code{none}, the text is printed verbatim.
4129
4130 If @option{expansion} is set to @code{normal} (which is the default),
4131 the following expansion mechanism is used.
4132
4133 The backslash character '\', followed by any character, always expands to
4134 the second character.
4135
4136 Sequence of the form @code{%@{...@}} are expanded. The text between the
4137 braces is a function name, possibly followed by arguments separated by ':'.
4138 If the arguments contain special characters or delimiters (':' or '@}'),
4139 they should be escaped.
4140
4141 Note that they probably must also be escaped as the value for the
4142 @option{text} option in the filter argument string and as the filter
4143 argument in the filtergraph description, and possibly also for the shell,
4144 that makes up to four levels of escaping; using a text file avoids these
4145 problems.
4146
4147 The following functions are available:
4148
4149 @table @command
4150
4151 @item expr, e
4152 The expression evaluation result.
4153
4154 It must take one argument specifying the expression to be evaluated,
4155 which accepts the same constants and functions as the @var{x} and
4156 @var{y} values. Note that not all constants should be used, for
4157 example the text size is not known when evaluating the expression, so
4158 the constants @var{text_w} and @var{text_h} will have an undefined
4159 value.
4160
4161 @item expr_int_format, eif
4162 Evaluate the expression's value and output as formatted integer.
4163
4164 The first argument is the expression to be evaluated, just as for the @var{expr} function.
4165 The second argument specifies the output format. Allowed values are 'x', 'X', 'd' and
4166 'u'. They are treated exactly as in the printf function.
4167 The third parameter is optional and sets the number of positions taken by the output.
4168 It can be used to add padding with zeros from the left.
4169
4170 @item gmtime
4171 The time at which the filter is running, expressed in UTC.
4172 It can accept an argument: a strftime() format string.
4173
4174 @item localtime
4175 The time at which the filter is running, expressed in the local time zone.
4176 It can accept an argument: a strftime() format string.
4177
4178 @item metadata
4179 Frame metadata. It must take one argument specifying metadata key.
4180
4181 @item n, frame_num
4182 The frame number, starting from 0.
4183
4184 @item pict_type
4185 A 1 character description of the current picture type.
4186
4187 @item pts
4188 The timestamp of the current frame.
4189 It can take up to two arguments.
4190
4191 The first argument is the format of the timestamp; it defaults to @code{flt}
4192 for seconds as a decimal number with microsecond accuracy; @code{hms} stands
4193 for a formatted @var{[-]HH:MM:SS.mmm} timestamp with millisecond accuracy.
4194
4195 The second argument is an offset added to the timestamp.
4196
4197 @end table
4198
4199 @subsection Examples
4200
4201 @itemize
4202 @item
4203 Draw "Test Text" with font FreeSerif, using the default values for the
4204 optional parameters.
4205
4206 @example
4207 drawtext="fontfile=/usr/share/fonts/truetype/freefont/FreeSerif.ttf: text='Test Text'"
4208 @end example
4209
4210 @item
4211 Draw 'Test Text' with font FreeSerif of size 24 at position x=100
4212 and y=50 (counting from the top-left corner of the screen), text is
4213 yellow with a red box around it. Both the text and the box have an
4214 opacity of 20%.
4215
4216 @example
4217 drawtext="fontfile=/usr/share/fonts/truetype/freefont/FreeSerif.ttf: text='Test Text':\
4218           x=100: y=50: fontsize=24: fontcolor=yellow@@0.2: box=1: boxcolor=red@@0.2"
4219 @end example
4220
4221 Note that the double quotes are not necessary if spaces are not used
4222 within the parameter list.
4223
4224 @item
4225 Show the tex